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Course Descriptions

Course Subject Course Number Course Name Credit Hours
ART 101
Art Appreciation 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

This course will introduce students to the study, practices, and production of visual art styles throughout history and across many cultures. Students will trace the history of art from prehistory to the present day with special attention to the artist's role in culture and in history. Students will have the opportunity to compose critical papers and creative projects that explore the complex relationship between culture and history.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
ART 300
Non-Western Art 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

This course is a survey of non-Western art, including painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the establishment of various civilizations and societies to the present. It is a study of the art of China, Japan, Korea, India, Africa, and Mesoamerica within the context of each culture.

3
BIO 101
Biology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GNST

Introduces the unique properties of living organisms and fundamental biological processes. Emphasis on molecular and cellular biology, bioenergetics, genetics, and ecological systems.

3
BIO 103
Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); This will not fulfill BIO 220 and BIO 221 course requirements. GNST

This course explores the major organ systems responsible for the maintenance of life, which are monitored in a healthcare setting. The focus is on the structure and function of the brain, systemic nerves, endocrine, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems. Blood and fluid/electrolyte balance are also considered.

3
BIO 105
Human Structure and Function 5 HOURS (5-0-0); This willnot fulfill BIO 220 and BIO 221 course requirements. GNST

Study of structure and function of the human body. Focuses on fundamental concepts of body organization and cellular function. Structure, functions, and terminology of the body systems are considered.

5
BIO 200
Science in the News 2 HOURS (2-0-0) ; GNST

Scientific advances are written about and broadcast every day in newspapers, radios, television, and the internet. The information to evaluate the validity of these advances is not. In this course, students will delve more deeply into popular science articles and critically analyze their accuracy, validity, and viewpoints. Topics will include current research that is reported in the popular press to long running scientific debates.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I Biology

2
BIO 201
Physiological Basis of Nutrition 2 HOURS (2-0-0); GNST

Adequate nutrition is the foundation of good health. The chemical compositions of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins are reviewed. The physiology of food utilization within the body and the chemistry of metabolism are examined in health. Basic principles of nutrition, including the Dietary Reference Intakes, assessment, and disease states are covered.

prerequisite(s): Anatomy and Physiology I Human Structure and Function

2
BIO 205
General Biology I 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

The basic concepts of biology upon which students can begin to develop a conceptual framework of the discipline will be developed in this course and reinforced in upper-level courses. Cell structure and function, molecular biology, Mendelian and population genetics, and evolutionary theory will be covered in this first semester of a two-semester sequence.

5
BIO 206
General Biology II 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

The basic concepts of biology upon which students can begin to develop a conceptual framework of the discipline will be developed in this course and reinforced in upper-level courses. This course covers biological diversity, taxonomy, homeostasis, internal transport and gas exchange in plants and animals, plant hormones, osmoregulation, mechanisms of action of muscular, nervous and neuroendocrine systems, and ecology will be covered in this second semester of a two-semester sequence.

prerequisite(s): General Biology I

5
BIO 210
Microbiology 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

Survey of representative types of microorganisms in terms of their structure, function, cultivation, identification, and methods employed for their control. Emphasis is placed on those causing human disease and the role of the immune system.

4
BIO 215L
Microbiology Laboratory 1 HOUR (0-1-0); GNST

In this laboratory course, students will observe, cultivate, characterize, and identify microorganisms and practice techniques that control, kill, and prevent the spread of them.

1
BIO 220
Anatomy and Physiology I 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

Study of structure and function of the human body. Focuses on fundamental concepts of body organization and cellular function. Structure, functions and terminology of the skeletal, muscular, integumentary and nervous system are considered.

4
BIO 221
Anatomy and Physiology II 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

Study of the structure and function of the human body. Focuses on structure and function of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Acid-base and fluid electrolyte balance are also considered.

prerequisite(s): Anatomy and Physiology I

4
BIO 225L
Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 1 HOUR (0-1-0); GNST

In this laboratory course, students will study the interrelationship between structure and function of the human body. The lab focuses on fundamental concepts of body organization and cellular function. Structure, functions, and terminology of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous system are examined.

1
BIO 226L
Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 1 HOUR (0-1-0); GNST

In this laboratory course, students will study the interrelationship between structure and function of the human body. During the course of study, students will focus on the important interaction between structure and function of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems through the use of gross anatomical and histological preparations. Virtual labs are used to allow students to observe what happens to organ function following anatomical manipulations.

1
BIO 240
Career Topics for Biology Majors 1 HOUR (1-0-0); Sophomore standing and admission to the BS Biology program is required to enroll in this course.

Introduces Biology majors to a variety of career paths. Guest speakers from health and research related fields will present what their field and job entails, along with the path they took to obtain their position. Students will also be required to do a minimum of two shadowing experiences within job fields they may like to pursue.

prerequisite(s): General Biology I General College Chemistry I

1
BIO 280
Independent Study 1-5 HOURS ((1-5)-0-0); GNST, GAPL

Supervised independent work in science designed to meet approved objectives/learner outcomes. Student must meet specific criteria and present the instructor with a detailed written proposal. Written approval must be obtained from the instructor and dean. Up to three hours of credit will be awarded.

prerequisite(s): Human Structure and Function Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II General Biology I General Biology II

1-5
BIO 290
Pathophysiology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GNST

Examination of basic pathophysiological processes followed by a survey of diseases of the various body systems. The various ways in which these diseases manifest themselves as symptoms and signs, as well as laboratory findings leading to diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis will be discussed. Students will critically analyze several case study examples.

prerequisite(s): Human Structure and Function Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II General Biology I General Biology II

3
BIO 330
Cardiovascular Physiology 2 HOURS (2-0-0); GNST

This course is designed to give students a better understanding of the functioning of the cardiovascular system. Focus will be placed on the structure and function of the cardiovascular system and how both systemic and local factors influence its functions. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of the autorhythmicity of cardiac cells, the influence of the autonomic nervous system and autorhythmicity and the cardiovascular system, the cardiac conduction system, neurophysiology of cardiac cells, ECG's, and cardiovascular pathophysiology.

prerequisite(s): Human Structure and Function Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

2
BIO 331
Renal Physiology 2 HOURS (2-0-0); GNST

This course is designed to give students a better understanding of the important aspects and fundamental concepts of how the kidneys function in health and disease. The course focuses on the important information necessary for students to develop a firm understanding of how the kidneys operate to maintain homeostasis. A greater understanding of the renal system serves as a frame of reference that students must comprehend before they can truly understand how alteration in renal function are associated with diseases and their clinical manifestations.

prerequisite(s): Human Structure and Function Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

2
BIO 332
Fluid and Electrolyte Balance 2 HOURS (2-0-0); GNST

This course is designed for students to gain a better understanding of the care and management of the patient with fluid and electrolyte disorders/imbalances. Focus will be placed on the composition of body fluids, fluid compartments, and factors that affect movement of water and solutes. The regulation of vascular volume and extracellular fluid osmolality will also be presented. Etiology, signs and symptoms, and treatment of patients with fluid and electrolyte imbalance, including but not limited to sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, and magnesium will be explored.

prerequisite(s): Human Structure and Function Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

2
BIO 336
Genetics 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

This course focuses on in-depth coverage of classical and molecular genetics. An emphasis will be placed on eukaryotic organisms, beginning with basic inheritance patterns and their uses in pedigrees and chromosomal mapping and continuing with the molecular biology of the cell including gene and chromosome structure, DNA replication, DNA repair, regulation of gene expression, and control of cell division. Laboratory sessions will focus on molecular genetic techniques and their potential use in research and medicine.

prerequisite(s): General Biology I

4
BIO 350
Biology of Human Reproduction 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GNST

This course examines the biological aspects of sexuality from a structural, functional, and evolutionary standpoint. Topics include human inheritance and genetic counseling, reproductive hormones, anatomy and physiology of the reproductive organs, the human sexual response, pregnancy and birth, fertility and infertility, sexual disorders and sexually transmitted diseases, evolution of human sexual behavior, and other related issues from a biological perspective.

prerequisite(s): Human Structure and Function Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

3
BIO 400
Service Learning in Biology 2 HOURS (1-1-0) ; Junior standing and admission to the BS Biology program is required to enroll in this course.

Students will learn and develop through active participation in organized service that is conducted in and meets a need of the community. Projects in the community will be identified based on community needs in health or science and student interest. Along with off-campus experiential learning in the community project, students will have structured time in class to reflect on the service experience and clarify goals and expectations of the project.

2
BIO 410
Cell Biology 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

This course focuses on the underlying molecular mechanisms of biological function at the cellular level. It includes the study of the internal organization of the cell, organelle and membrane function, cell-cell signaling, cell movement, cell adhesion, and the extracellular matrix.

prerequisite(s): General Biology I General Biology II Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

4
BIO 420
Histology 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

Histology is an introduction to the microscopic anatomy of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs. The emphasis of the course will be on the study of human tissues and organs. The intention of the course is to build upon previously acquired knowledge of the cell and expand to cell differentiation, tissue, and organ development. Topics that will be covered include Cells and Basic Tissues, such as Epithelium and Integumentary Tissues; Loose, Dense and Specialized Connective Tissue; Adipose, Circulatory, Respiratory, and Endocrine Tissues; Nervous and Sensory Tissue; Digestive Tissue; Renal and Reproductive Tissues.

prerequisite(s): General Biology I General Biology II Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

4
BIO 430
Principles of Ecology 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

Ecology is the discipline in biology that studies the interaction between organisms and their environment. Topics covered include the dynamics among individuals of the same species, interactions between species, relations between living organisms and their nonliving environment, and the cycling of nutrients and energy.

prerequisite(s): General Biology I General Biology II Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

4
BIO 440
Research Experience 1-5 HOURS (0-(1-5)-0)

Off campus experiential learning of a pre-professional nature for work in research laboratories. Prerequisites and or Co-Requisites: Junior status in the Biology degree program and permission of instructor.

1-5
BIO 450
Immunology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GNST

Building upon a previously acquired knowledge of the cells and organ systems, Immunology focuses on how the human immune system functions at the molecular and cellular levels. An emphasis is placed on understanding how innate and adaptive immunity work together to protect us from infectious agents and diseases, and what occurs when the immune system malfunctions. The characteristics of immunizations, immune system deficiencies, AIDS, autoimmunity, and cancer are explored. In addition, the development and use of therapeutic agents in treating immune system based diseases is examined.

prerequisite(s): General Biology I General Biology II Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II Microbiology Pathophysiology

3
CED ES01
Pre-Hospital Provider Anatomy and Physiology 0 HOURS (0-0-0); This course is not considered college level coursework. Pass/Fail grading option only.

This course is designed to give students the depth and breadth of knowledge in anatomy and physiology necessary to function as an entry-level paramedic. The course will be based on recommendations under the new paramedic curriculum issued under the National Highway and Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA).

0
CED ES10
Introduction to Basic Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine 0 HOURS (0-0-0); This course is not considered college level coursework. Pass/Fail grading option only.

This course will introduce the student to preparatory pre-hospital care including roles and responsibilities, wellness of the EMT-Basic, injury and illness prevention, and medical/legal and ethical issues. A general review of anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, communication and documentation techniques, and principles of operations will be discussed. Important techniques such as airway management and ventilation, patient assessment of the medical and trauma patient, and caring for the infant, child, adult and geriatric patient will be covered.

0
CED ES20
Basic Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine Clinical Practicum 0 HOURS (0-0-0); This course is not considered college level coursework. Pass/Fail grading option only.

This course will introduce the student to preparatory pre-hospital care including roles and responsibilities, wellness of the EMT-Basic, injury and illness prevention, and medical/legal and ethical issues. A general review of anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, communication and documentation techniques and principles of operations will be discussed. Important techniques such as airway management and ventilation, patient assessment of the medical and trauma patient, and caring for the infant, child, adult and geriatric patient will be covered.

0
CED PH01
Phlebotomy Theory and Practice 0 HOURS (0-0-0); This course is only available to students in the Phlebotomy Program and is not considered college level coursework. Pass/Fail grading option only.

This course covers essential professional knowledge required of an entry-level phlebotomist. Anatomy, physiology, infection control, patient safety, HIPAA, professionalism, medical terminology, and venipuncture techniques will be studied. Students will also practice laboratory skills and venipuncture techniques necessary for clinical fieldwork.

0
CED PH02
Phlebotomy Practicum 0 HOURS (0-0-0); This course is only available to students in the Phlebotomy Program and is not considered college level coursework. Pass/Fail grading option only.

This course gives students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience and document the required clinical competencies for the NCPT certification examination. Students will be required to perform 100 successful venipunctures and 5 successful capillary punctures during 100 hours of clinical practice under the supervision of qualified instructors and preceptors.

0
CHM 100
Elementary Chemistry 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

A laboratory introductory course with atomic structure and bonding as a basis for understanding valence, formulas, compounds, and chemical reactions. Measurement, states of matter, solutions, ionization, and their applications in daily life are discussed. Math skills are applied to comprehend chemistry content.

5
CHM 111
Basic Organic and Biochemistry 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

A laboratory course that focuses on organic chemistry (hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, and amides), the structure and function of biomolecules (carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids), and metabolism.

prerequisite(s): Elementary Chemistry

4
CHM 112
Basic Organic and Biochemistry  
A didactic course that focuses on organic chemistry (hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, ester, amines and amides), the structure and function of biomolecules (carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, protein and nucleic acids), and metabolism.

prerequisite(s): Elementary Chemistry

3
CHM 115L
Basic Organic and Biochemistry Lab 1 HOUR (0-1-0); GNST

In this laboratory course, students will study the relationship between the structure and function of organic and biomolecules. The course includes the analysis of organic compounds, synthesis and analysis of biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, and the analysis of carbohydrates and lipids.

1
CHM 210
General College Chemistry I 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

Deals with the principles of inorganic chemistry including formulas, equations, reaction principles, atomic and molecular structure, bonding thermochemistry, states of matter, stoichiometry, and the periodic table. Provides the basis of all higher levels of chemistry.

prerequisite(s): College Algebra

5
CHM 211
General College Chemistry II 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

Continues the study of General College Chemistry I (CHM 210). Includes chemical equilibria, kinetics, solutions, acids and bases, complex ions and coordination compounds redox reactions, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, and brief introduction to organic chemistry and qualitative analysis.

prerequisite(s): General College Chemistry I

5
CHM 320
Organic Chemistry I 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

This course is the first semester of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence. The intention of the course is to provide a good background in organic chemistry for subsequent science classes. Topics that will be covered include bonding theories, alkanes, cycloalkanes, acid-base chemistry, stereochemistry, alkenes, alkynes, haloalkanes, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, alcohols, and ethers.

prerequisite(s): General College Chemistry II

5
CHM 321
Organic Chemistry II 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

This course is the second semester of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence. The intention of the course is to provide a good background in organic chemistry for subsequent science classes. Topics that will be covered include aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, carboxylic acid derivatives, enolate chemistry, conjugated dienes, aromatic compounds, amines, carbohydrates, and amino acids.

prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry I

5
CHM 410
Biochemistry 5 HOURS (4-1-0); GNST

This course introduces the fundamental principles of modern biological chemistry. Includes the structure, chemistry and metabolism of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and other biomolecules. In the biochemistry laboratory, students will become familiar with many of the laboratory practices and techniques that are used in the preparation, isolation, purification, and identification of biochemical compounds. Specifically, the course is designed to teach common biochemical techniques such as electrophoresis, protein assays, enzyme kinetics protein purification, and recombinant DNA methods, and give students an appreciation for the application of these techniques in solving various kinds of problems in biochemistry research.

prerequisite(s): Organic Chemistry I

5
CHW 101
Introduction to Community Health Worker 4 HOURS (3-1-0); Admission to the Community Health Worker certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course presents an overview of the roles and responsibilities of a community health worker as an integral member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team, or a patient centered medical home (PCMH). Areas of focus include healthcare and social needs across the lifespan, health education, and individual and community advocacy. Confidentiality and basic office skills required of community health workers will be also be covered.

4
CHW 102
Advanced Topics for the Community Health Worker 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

This course is designed to broaden the students' skill set required to effectively advocate, refer, and assist in care coordination in the communities in which they will serve, especially with diverse and high-risk populations. Emphasis will be placed on community resources, referral systems, documentation, care coordination, and skills to execute an effective home visit.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to Community Health Worker

3
CHW 103
Directed Clinical Practice in Community Health 2 HOURS (0-0-2)

This course will provide students the opportunity to act in their roles as community health workers in a variety of community settings and with diverse client populations. Students will demonstrate knowledge and skills in six major competency areas: healthcare, community resources, communication skills, individual and community advocacy, health education, and service skills & responsibilities.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to Community Health Worker

2
CHW 104
Community Health Worker Capstone 2 HOURS (2-0-0)

This course explores a variety of concepts focusing on the professional aspects of a community health worker and skills necessary to transition into the workforce. Topics such as professionalism, job-readiness, resume writing, and interviewing skills, and current healthcare trends and case studies will be addressed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to Community Health Worker

2
CHW 105
Healthcare and the Community 2 HOURS (2-0-0)

The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of healthcare disparities from the perspective of the social determinants of health. By exploring the interplay between culture, socio-economic status, geography, community, and healthcare policy, students will develop the skills necessary to mitigate the impact of social determinants in the healthcare environment. Coursework integrates strategic diversity management, self-reflective leadership and the personal change process, with culturally and linguistically appropriate care into a cohesive systems-oriented approach for health care professionals.

2
COM 201
Principles of Communication 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

The purpose of this course is to examine communication theories and to practice fundamentals essential for developing oral, writte, and visual communication skills. Participation in class exercises and individual presentation leading to effective interpersonal and group communication are required.

3
COM 260
Public Speaking 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

This course develops students' skills in several forms of public address and presentation, making them effective communicators in their chosen fields.

3
COM 290
Entertainment in American Life 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

Entertainment plays a vital role in American culture. This course raises awareness and deepens understanding of this role in intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, organizational, and mass communication; traces its historical origins and ethical implications; and enables conscious and responsible choices as the result of this awareness and understanding.

3
COM 360
Communication for Professional Success 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

Communication and critical thinking skills are necessary both to secure a job and succeed in the diverse, ever-changing workplace of the 21st century. Students in this course study resume building, interviewing, self-care, face-to-face communication on the job, development of interpersonal skills, meeting management presentational speaking, electronic communication skills, and communication flow in organizations.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I English Composition II

3
EMS 112
Introduction to Paramedic Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine 6.5 HOURS (4-2.5-0)

This course will introduce the student to preparatory pre-hospital care including roles and responsibilities, wellness of the EMT-Paramedic, injury and illness prevention, and medical/legal and ethical issues. A general review of anatomy and physiology as well as pharmacology, venous access and medication administration, therapeutic communications, and life span development will be covered. Important techniques such as airway management and ventilation, patient assessment, and trauma integration & management will be included.

6.5
EMS 113
Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum I 2 HOURS (0-0-2)

This course will focus on demonstration and performance of accurate patient assessments, safe venous access, administration of medications, endotracheal intubation, and ventilation of patients of all age groups.

2
EMS 114
Paramedic I 9 HOURS (5-4-0)

This course will introduce the student to preparatory pre-hospital care including roles and responsibilities, wellness of the EMT-Paramedic, injury and illness prevention, and medical/legal and ethical issues. A general review of anatomy and physiology as well as pharmacology, venous access and medication administration, therapeutic communications, and life span development will be covered. Important techniques such as airway management and ventilation, patient assessment, and trauma integration and management will be included.  Examination of a variety of common medical emergencies, as well as proper patient assessment, exam, and interventions. Disorders of the following types will be addressed: behavioral and psychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and head, eye, ear, nose, and throat. Emergencies involving gynecology and obstetrics will also be studied. Care of special populations will be addressed, including the neonatal, pediatric, and geriatric patients, as well as victims of abuse or assault. Acute intervention of the chronically ill patient will also be presented. 

prerequisite(s): Pre-Hospital Provider Anatomy and Physiology

9
EMS 121
Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum II 2 HOURS (0-0-2)

This course will enhance the clinical skills of the paramedic student to perform comprehensive patient assessments and integrate assessment findings while formulating a treatment plan in the pre-hospital clinical setting.

prerequisite(s): Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum I

2
EMS 122
Emergency Cardiovascular Disease 6.5 HOURS (4-2.5-0)

This course will cover the aspects of the cardiovascular system including disease pathology, cardiac arrhythmias, and vascular disorders. Students will understand cardiovascular complaints, cardiac monitoring, and management of cardiovascular emergencies.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to Paramedic Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine

6.5
EMS 123
Paramedic II 9 HOURS (5-4-0)

This course will cover the aspects of the cardiovascular system including disease pathology, cardiac arrhythmias, and vascular disorders. Students will understand cardiovascular complaints, cardiac monitoring, and management of cardiovascular emergencies. This course will allow the student to study common medical emergencies, such as those involving respiratory, neurological, endocrine, immune system problems and infections, and communicable diseases. Care of poisoned patients and patients that have overdoses, street drugs, and common abused medications will be included.  Patient assessment and documentation skills will be the focus of the lab sessions. 

prerequisite(s): Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum I Paramedic I

9
EMS 132
Pre-Hospital Capstone Field Practicum 2 HOURS (0-0-2)

In this course, the paramedic student will exhibit behaviors indicative of a team leader in a field setting, utilizing critical thinking and decision-making skills in the assessment, management, and treatment of the pre-hospital emergency patient. Important considerations regarding continuing education, job requirements, and professionalism will be included.

prerequisite(s): Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum II

2
EMS 133
Medical Emergencies I 4.5 HOURS (2-2.5-0)

This course will allow the student to study a variety of common medical emergencies, as well as proper patient assessment, exam, and interventions. Disorders of the following types will be addressed: behavioral and psychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and head, eye, ear, nose, and throat. Emergencies involving gynecology and obstetrics will also be studied. Care of special populations will be addressed, including the neonatal, pediatric, and geriatric patients, as well as victims of abuse or assault. Acute intervention of the chronically ill patient will also be presented.

4.5
EMS 134
Medical Emergencies II 4.5 HOURS (2-2.5-0)

This course will allow the student to study a variety of common medical emergencies, including appropriate patient assessment, exam, and interventions. Topics will include disorders of the respiratory, neurological, immune, endocrine, gastrointestinal, renal, urogenital, and cutaneous systems, as well as toxicology, substance abuse, and infectious and communicable diseases.

4.5
EMS 135
Pre-Hospital Transfer to Practice 2 HOURS (1-1-0)

This course will provide students with the skills necessary to transition into the EMS field as a paramedic. It offers integration of current trends/topics in the field, continuing education requirements, resume writing and interviewing, values, personal excellence, professionalism, self-assessment, special interventions, and review for the National Registry Exam.

prerequisite(s): Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum I Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum II Emergency Cardiovascular Disease Medical Emergencies I Medical Emergencies II

2
EMS 136
Emergency Medical Operations 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

Assessment-based management and ambulance operations will be covered in this course. Students will learn general incident and multiple casualty incident management techniques, as well as rescue awareness.

3
EMS 137
Paramedic III 9 HOURS (5-4-0)

Assessment-based management and ambulance operations will be covered in this course.  Students will learn general incident and multiple casualty incident management techniques, as well as rescue awareness and response to terrorist attacks. This course will provide students with the skills necessary to transition into the EMS field as a paramedic.  It offers integration of current trends/topics in the field, continuing education requirements, resume writing and interviewing, values, personal excellence, professionalism, self-assessment, special interventions, and review for the National Registry Exam.  

prerequisite(s): Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum I Paramedic I Pre-Hospital Clinical Practicum II Paramedic II

9
ENG 101
English Composition I 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GCOM

Various reading and writing assignments broaden understanding of diverse topics, varied cultures, life experiences, and social and professional issues while improving skills in writing and oral expression. The overall course goal is that students enjoy a richer personal and professional life through writing and gain a basic command of Standard English. APA documentation style, critical analysis, and basic research techniques are introduced.

3
ENG 102
English Composition II 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GCOM

This course is designed to reinforce a process approach to writing while developing the variety of styles required for effective communication. Analytical thinking and critical reading form the basis for clear and concise writing addressing differing purposes with an emphasis on argumentation. A review of standard English rules is integrated with peer review and instructor critique of major project and presentation.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I

3
ENG 210
The Short Story 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

Introduces readers to a wide range of narratives, both classical and contemporary. It provides a variety of reading experiences from both men and women and from various ethnic as well as mainstream cultures. The course will review plot elements and certain literary devices that enhance the reading experience. Students explore what they believe to be the author's purpose(s) as well as meanings they find in the works themselves.

3
ENG 280
Independent Study 1-3 HOURS ((1-3)-0-0); GAHD, GAPL

Supervised independent work in English designed to meet approved objectives/learner outcomes. Student must meet specific criteria and present the instructor with a detailed written proposal. Written approval must be obtained from the instructor and dean prior to enrollment.

1-3
HCA 105
Productivity Applications for Healthcare Professionals 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Students will be required to have a current Office 365 subscription. GAPL

This course will introduce essential applications used in the healthcare business environment. Emphasis will be placed on Word, Excel, and PowerPoint within Office 365. Cloud integration and other Office 365 applications will also be explored. Computer fundamentals required for Office 365 will be reviewed.

3
HCA 110
Essentials of Personal Finance for Healthcare Professionals 1 HOUR (1-0-0)

This course introduces practical applications of personal finance for current and future healthcare professionals. Subjects include investments, debt, insurance, and credit. Retirement planning, education funding, and budgeting will be discussed.

1
HCA 301
Introduction to the United States Healthcare System 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the U.S. healthcare system, its components, organization, and management systems. Subjects include the historical development and the role of government within healthcare. Key stakeholders and major funding sources will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I

3
HCA 310
Organizational Behavior in Healthcare 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the analysis of individual and group behavior in healthcare organizations. Topics include motivation, stress, individual and group behavior, conflict, power and politics, and leadership. Job design, organizational culture and structure, decision making, communication, and organizational change will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 312
Human Resource Management in Healthcare Organizations 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course examines the management of human resources in healthcare organizations. Subjects include recruitment, selection, training, retention, performance, motivation, and workforce diversity. Legal and regulatory requirements will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 316
Healthcare Information Systems 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course introduces information systems and applications essential for healthcare administration. The importance of healthcare information systems to patient outcomes are discussed. Topics also include the selection process, service requirements, and portfolio management of healthcare information systems. Data security and confidentiality will be explored.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 318
Principles of Healthcare Marketing 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to marketing concepts with emphasis on marketing practices for healthcare organizations. Subjects include consumer orientation, marketing plans, and strategy development. Current marketing issues and future trends will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 330
Principles of Accounting for Healthcare 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to managerial and financial accounting. In addition, the course will review specific accounting practices and applications within healthcare organizations.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 399
Special Topics in Healthcare Administration 3 HOURS (3-0-0); This course can be repeated for credit if topics differ.

This course will focus on a selected healthcare administration topic.

3
HCA 404
Healthcare Administration Practicum 1-3 HOURS (0-0-(1-3)); This course should be taken within two semesters of expected graduation. This course can be repeated once for credit.

This course provides an experiential learning experience at a healthcare organization in which students will apply professional skills, knowledge, and behaviors learned in the program.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

1-3
HCA 410
Introduction to Healthcare Finance 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to financial principles and concepts required for healthcare operations. Subjects include financial statement analysis, costs structure and allocation, dashboards, and variance analysis. Return on investment, financial ratios, financial risk, investment analysis, and working capital will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 412
Healthcare Law and Ethics 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is an introduction to the laws and ethics that affect healthcare decisions, relationships among professionals and patients, and the management aspects of healthcare delivery. Subjects include regulatory processes, legal terminology, and the U.S. legal system. Ethical issues will be explored within the context of healthcare operations and delivery.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 419
Reimbursement, Insurance, and Managed Care 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course covers health insurance products and managed care approaches to the financing and delivery of healthcare services. Subjects include reimbursement and payment methodologies. Concepts in insurance, third party and prospective payments, and managed care organizations will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 420
Fundamentals of Healthcare Economics 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course provides an introduction of basic economic models and theories applicable to healthcare delivery. Supply, demand, and their interaction in the healthcare economy are explored. Influences on demand, including pricing, insurance coverage, and income will be analyzed. Competition and other market structures will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 435
Quality Improvement and Patient Safety 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course introduces quality management principles, tools, and techniques, with an emphasis on the application of management theory and best practices to healthcare organizations. Concepts and practices for patient safety within an organizational context will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 440
Fundamentals of Population Health for Healthcare Administrators 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course will examine how health services are proactively used to maintain and improve health with the benefit of improving outcomes and lowering costs. The use of data, provider and patient engagement, and community integration will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System English Composition I

3
HCA 450
Healthcare Management 3 HOURS (3-0-0); This course should be take in the final semester the student is to graduate.

This course will unify multiple content areas presented throughout the Healthcare Administration program to develop a cohesive study of roles and responsibilities required of healthcare managers. Subjects include human resources, accounting and finance, law and ethics, marketing, and professional development. Population health, organizational behavior, quality improvement, patient safety, leadership, and career planning will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the United States Healthcare System Human Resource Management in Healthcare Organizations Introduction to Healthcare Finance Reimbursement, Insurance, and Managed Care Quality Improvement and Patient Safety English Composition I

3
HIS 210
Healthcare Right or Privilege? 1 HOUR (1-0-0)

Learn and explore the relationship between the U.S. federal government, as framed in the Constitution, and the U.S. healthcare system. In the preamble of the Constitution it is noted that the government was formed to ''promote the General Welfare of the United States.'' This class explores and debates various interpretations of the government's connection to healthcare since the Constitution was ratified in 1788.

1
HIT 104
Introduction to Medical Coding Systems 1 HOUR (1-0-0)

Introduction to various coding and classification systems used in healthcare. The format, structure, and appropriate use of various coding and classification systems in both inpatient and outpatient settings will be discussed.

1
HIT 105
Medical Terminology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAPL

Introduces the student to the language for the health profession. Emphasis will be on basic principles of medical word building, definitions, spelling, and pronunciation.

3
HIT 110
Pharmacology for Health Information Technology 2 HOURS (2-0-0); GAPL

This basic course focuses on a survey of multiple therapeutic substances with emphasis on drug classification, physiologic effects, response monitoring, and evaluation of action. Side effects, medication interactions, and indications for use will also be discussed.

2
HIT 114
Foundations in Health Information Technology 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

Students are introduced to the health information technology profession primarily in the acute setting and the role it plays throughout the continuum of healthcare. Health record content and documentation requirements along with record collection, analysis, storage, and retrieval processes will be discussed and practiced through simulation.

3
HIT 126
Clinical Coding/Classification Systems I 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

An introduction to various coding and classification systems used in healthcare. This course will focus on the current International Classification of Diseases (ICD) revision for acute care inpatient diagnosis and procedure coding. Laboratory practice time devoted to code assignment using computerized and manual methods.

prerequisite(s): Medical Terminology Foundations in Health Information Technology Human Structure and Function

3
HIT 142
Legal Aspects in Health Information 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

The student will evaluate health records for legal purposes. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) legislation is discussed with emphasis on privacy regulations. To provide a foundation in federal and state legislation regarding the release of health information, retention, authorizations, and consents. The importance of confidentiality and professional ethics will be emphasized.

prerequisite(s): Foundations in Health Information Technology

3
HIT 150
Professional Practice Lab 1 HOUR (0-1-0)

Practical aspects of Health Information Management (HIM) are introduced in a virtual setting. This experience provides the students with hands-on exposure of the various functions and the operational flow of an HIM department through simulating tasks using various software applications.

prerequisite(s): Pharmacology for Health Information Technology Clinical Coding/Classification Systems I Pathophysiology

1
HIT 190
ICD-9 to ICD-10 Transition 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

This course is intended for those with medical coding experience or those who have completed an approved ICD-9-CM medical coding course and need the necessary skills to transition to the ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS code sets. In addition to guided hands-on exercises, students will be given instruction on using the industry codebooks, including the format, use, and requirements of the new code sets.

prerequisite(s): Clinical Coding/Classification Systems I

3
HIT 206
Health Data Management and Analytics 3 HOURS (2-1-0); GAPL

Using various tools and applications, students will prepare, describe, analyze, and disseminate the results from data analytics case studies. Students will also explore health information exchange concepts, and identify patterns and correlations in administrative, financial, and patient-related decisions.

prerequisite(s): Productivity Applications for Healthcare Professionals

3
HIT 216
Information Systems in Healthcare 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

Students are introduced to various health information systems, with a focus on the electronic health record. The role, selection process, use, privacy, and security of information technology in the healthcare delivery system are also explored.

prerequisite(s): Foundations in Health Information Technology

3
HIT 220
Health Information in Ancillary Care Facilities 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

Introduction to health information, medical staff, and personnel requirements in non-acute care settings. Includes aspects related to licensing, certifying, and accrediting agencies.

prerequisite(s): Foundations in Health Information Technology

3
HIT 234
Clinical Coding/Classification Systems II 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

Introduction to coding using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and Healthcare Procedure Common Coding System (HCPCS) classifications with emphasis on the basic skills required to code medical services and procedures.

prerequisite(s): Pharmacology for Health Information Technology Clinical Coding/Classification Systems I Pathophysiology

3
HIT 235
Medical Reimbursement 2 HOURS (2-0-0)

Students are introduced to basic reimbursement terminology and how validation of data collected, clinical coding systems, and various reimbursement methodologies are used for appropriate payment for inpatient and outpatient healthcare services.

2
HIT 238
Healthcare Registries and Statistics 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAPL

Introduction to healthcare data, vital statistics, indices, and registries. Statistics related to health information, including calculation of rates and percentages. In-depth instruction in cancer registries. Manual and automated techniques of maintaining completeness, accuracy, and appropriateness of data and data sources.

prerequisite(s): Foundations in Health Information Technology Productivity Applications for Healthcare Professionals

3
HIT 243
Clinical Quality Management 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

Emphasis is on current philosophy and methodology in conducting an effective quality improvement, utilization review/case management program for a healthcare facility. Requirements of various governmental, third party payers, and accreditation bodies regarding appropriate utilization of resources and continuous quality improvement will be included. Case studies and simulated chart reviews will be integrated in the course.

prerequisite(s): Foundations in Health Information Technology Productivity Applications for Healthcare Professionals

3
HIT 244
Healthcare Data in Reimbursement 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

Theory and practice related to healthcare reimbursement using the current classification systems for diagnosis and procedure codes in healthcare settings. Emphasis will be on inpatient and outpatient prospective payment systems.

prerequisite(s): Professional Practice Lab Health Information in Ancillary Care Facilities Clinical Coding/Classification Systems II

3
HIT 248
Health Information Management and Leadership 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

Overview of management principles and practices essential to the Health Information profession. Concepts related to leadership roles, strategic, financial, organizational, and human resource management in an ever-changing environment will be studied.

prerequisite(s): Professional Practice Lab Health Information in Ancillary Care Facilities Information Systems in Healthcare

3
HIT 250
Professional Practice Experience and HIT Seminar 2 HOURS (0-1-1)

Practical, technical, and managerial aspects of health information management are emphasized. Students are given broader perspective of health information management and its use throughout various departments and healthcare settings. Practicum is supplemented with instructional guidance, observation, and simulated activities using web-based software applications. Also included is preparation for RHIT examination.

prerequisite(s): Legal Aspects in Health Information Information Systems in Healthcare Health Information in Ancillary Care Facilities Clinical Quality Management

2
HSC 100
Introduction to Health Careers 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course introduces students planning a career in health sciences to the broad and diverse range of occupations and specializations they could pursue. Subjects covered will include types of careers, job requirements, educational and licensing requirements, as well as leadership and communication skills necessary for these types of professions.

3
IMG 305
Imaging Informatics 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will present foundations and applications of Picture Archival and Communication Systems (PACS). Network fundamentals, information systems and imaging standards, user training, workflow, vendor selection, and imaging disaster recovery will be examined.

3
IMG 310
Sectional Anatomy for Medical Imaging 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is a study of human anatomy as viewed in sectional planes. Gross anatomical structures will be located and identified in axial (transverse), sagittal, coronal, and orthogonal (oblique) planes. The characteristic appearance of each anatomical structure as it appears on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be stressed. Studies include the head, brain, neck, chest, abdomen, spine, pelvis, and extremities. Common pathologic conditions seen in CT and MRI will also be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Human Structure and Function Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II

3
IMG 325
Communication and Patient Education 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Imaging Quality and Safety certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will focus on patient and professional communication strategies in the imaging sciences. Topics will include patient-centered approaches, care for special-patient populations, team communication, and patient education. Concepts of health literacy, health disparities, and patient satisfaction will be emphasized throughout the course.

3
IMG 330
Principles of Computed Tomography 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging or the Computed Tomography certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course explores physical principles and instrumentation associated with computed tomography (CT). Computer technology, system components, image characteristics, and quality control methods are introduced. Topics will include methods of data acquisition and manipulation, CT systems and operations, and image processing and display.

3
IMG 340
Computed Tomography Applications 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is designed to provide detailed coverage of procedures for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Imaging protocols for the head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and spine will be discussed. Topics include indications for the procedure, patient education, preparation, orientation and positioning, patient history and assessment, contrast media usage, scout image, and selectable scan parameters.

prerequisite(s): Principles of Computed Tomography

3
IMG 345
Principles of Bone Densitometry 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Mammography and Bone Densitometry certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will overview bone densitometry procedures, osteoporosis, and bone health. Procedures of the lumbar spine, femur, and forearm will be discussed. Topics will include patient preparation and safety, equipment operation, and quality control as it relates to bone densitometry.

3
IMG 350
Principles of Mammography 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Mammography and Bone Densitometry certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will introduce mammographic imaging. Topics will include breast screening rationale, breast anatomy and physiology, breast pathology, mammographic imaging equipment, and mammography imaging techniques. The role of the mammographer in patient education and patient assessment will also be discussed.

3
IMG 355
Advanced Breast Imaging 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Mammography and Bone Densitometry certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will present an overview of advanced breast imaging techniques and treatment processes. Topics will include mammography quality practices, breast tomosynthesis, breast ultrasound, breast MRI, breast interventional procedures, and breast cancer treatment approaches. Current and trending breast imaging topics will also be discussed.

3
IMG 370
Advancements in Sonography 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will cover the history of ultrasound development and current advances in ultrasound technology and sonography imaging. Students will research, compare, and explore ultrasound equipment manufacturers, new uses of medical ultrasound imaging technologies, advances in procedures and protocols in the field of sonography, alternate imaging disciplines, and safety trends in sonography.

3
IMG 399
Special Topics in Medical Imaging 1-3 HOURS ((1-3)-0-0) ; The course can be repeated for credit if topics differ. Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will focus on a selected imaging science topic.

1-3
IMG 400
Medical Imaging Safety and Standards 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or Imaging Certificate programs is required to enroll in this course.
This course will focus on safety topics and professional guidelines in the imaging sciences. Topics will include modality-specific safety considerations, ethical practice, accreditation, infection control, procedural appropriateness and optimization, injury and error, safety culture, and other trending field topics. Imaging literature, clinical resources, and practice standards will be emphasized throughout the course.
3
IMG 410
Quality Improvement in Medical Imaging 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Imaging Quality and Safety certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will expose medical imaging professionals to continuous quality improvement culture. Topics will include medical imaging improvement targets, performance indicators, and process improvement models and tools. The review, assessment, and development of quality improvement resources will be emphasized to empower students to contribute to workplace interventions.

3
IMG 415
Research in Medical Imaging 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Imaging Quality and Safety certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course is an introduction to research in the imaging sciences. Topics will include research, terminology, literature searching, and literature evaluation. Manuscript development, peer review, and the publication process will also be addressed.

3
IMG 430
Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Magnetic Resonance Imaging certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will familiarize the student with physical principles and theories of magnetic resonance, instrumentation, imaging sequences, and computer parameters of magnetic resonance imaging. Topics include image formation, artifact production, volume imaging, and multiplanar reconstruction.

3
IMG 431
Advanced Imaging Practicum 1-3 HOURS (0-0-(1-3)); This course is repeatable for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program is required to enroll in this course.

This course allows students to perform clinical repetitions in advanced imaging modalities. Repetitions will be directly related to post-primary certification exam requirements.

1-3
IMG 440
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Applications 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Magnetic Resonance Imaging certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course is designed to provide a functional understanding of MRI procedures. Imaging protocols for the central nervous system, musculoskeletal system, thorax, and abdomen/pelvis will be discussed. Topics include indications for the procedure, patient education, preparation, patient screening, contrast media usage, and special procedures.

prerequisite(s): Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

3
IMG 445
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program or the Magnetic Resonance Imaging certificate program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will present a holistic overview of safety considerations in MRI. Topics may include magnetic fields, contrast agents, implant and device safety, and comprehensive screening procedures. Safety zones, pregnancy policies, patient codes, and the role of a Magnetic Resonance Safety Officer will also be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

3
IMG 450
Principles of Vascular-Interventional Radiography 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Medical Imaging program is required to enroll in this course.

This course will overview vascular-interventional radiography fundamentals. Various procedures will be investigated including neurologic, thoracic, abdominal, and peripheral vascular exams. Additional topics will include equipment and instrumentation, interventional pharmacology, venous access, and common pathologies and corresponding treatments.

3
IMG 470
Medical Imaging Management 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course will emphasize tasks, responsibilities, and skills necessary for leading multi-modality medical imaging departments. Focus will be placed on operational and asset management.

3
IMG 480
Medical Imaging Capstone 3 HOURS (3-0-0); This course should be taken in the same semester as graduation.

This course will allow students to integrate various curricular concepts by focusing on current or trending topics related to the imaging sciences. Students will be required to complete a summative course project. Elements of project management and career and personal development will be emphasized.

3
IMG 491
Independent Study in Medical Imaging 1-3 HOURS ((1-3)-0-0)

Supervised independent work in the Imaging Sciences designed to meet approved objectives/learner outcomes. Student must meet specific criteria and present the instructor with a detailed written proposal. Written approval must be obtained from the instructor and dean prior to enrollment.

1-3
MTH 098
Basic Math This course does not meet graduation requirements. Placement scores are used to determine course enrollment. If a student is unsuccessful in a second enrollment, they will be dismissed from the College.

This course is designed to strengthen students' basic mathematical skills. Includes a thorough review and practice of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percent. Converting between fraction, decimal,  and percent is stressed. Solving ratio and proportion, the basic percent equation, and business and consumer applications, reading statistical graphs, converting units of measure, using rational numbers, and solving simple equations are also incorporated.

0
MTH 100
Intermediate Algebra 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course includes a review of the fundamentals of algebra from order of operations to logarithmic and exponential equations. The course uses the four mathematical operations with signed numbers and variable expressions, solving linear inequalities and quadratic equations, applying the four mathematical operations to rational expressions and polynomials, factoring polynomials, graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving system of linear equations, exponential and logarithmic functions and applications, and introduction to radicals and the quadratic formula. There is an emphasis on critical thinking problems and ratio and proportions problems as they relate to solving drug dosage problems.

3
MTH 104
Mathematical Formulas, Models, and Probability 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GMSL

This course consists of five parts: a review of basic math and algebra needed for coursework; higher level applications of basic concepts including dimensional analysis; probability concepts needed for Statistics and life situations including combinations and permutations; exponential and logarithmic equations as applied to financial and scientific calculations; and independent demonstration of critical thinking.

prerequisite(s): Intermediate Algebra

3
MTH 130
College Algebra 4 HOURS (4-0-0); A scientific calculator is required. GMSL

This is a more advanced course in the study of algebra. Topics include relations; functions; complex numbers; logarithms; solving linear, quadratic, and other higher degree equations and inequalities; graphing equations and functions; solving system of equations in two and three variables; using matrices and determinants; and sequences, series, and probability. Modeling is emphasized.

prerequisite(s): Intermediate Algebra

4
MTH 132
Basic Trigonometry 1 HOUR (1-0-0); A graphing calculator is required. GMSL

An introduction or review of basic trigonometric functions, characteristics, and relationships that are used in MTH 150 Calculus.

1
MTH 140
Introduction to Statistics 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GMSL

This course provides an overview of tools for the analysis and interpretation of data. Topics include use of normal distributions; tests of means, variances and proportions; analysis of variance and covariance models; correlation and regression; and non-parametric analysis.

prerequisite(s): Intermediate Algebra

3
MTH 145
Precalculus Mathematics 4 HOURS (4-0-0); GMSL

An introduction to analysis of functions including exponential, logarithmic, rational, polynomial, absolute value, and trigonometric functions. Application of theorems on rational and complex zeros of polynomials and solving systems of linear equations. Trigonometric identities and trigonometric equations.

prerequisite(s): Intermediate Algebra

4
MTH 150
Calculus 4 HOURS (4-0-0); GMSL

Differential and integral calculus including applications.

prerequisite(s): Intermediate Algebra Precalculus Mathematics College Algebra Basic Trigonometry

4
MUS 101
Introduction to Music Appreciation 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

An introduction to musical literature and its development from the Common Practice Period through the 20th Century. The course emphasizes important composers, compositions, and stylistic traits that are universally recognized in western music.

3
MUS 301
History of Rock and Roll 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

This course will enable students to trace the musical stylistic and societal impact of Rock and Roll music from its origins in the mid-20th Century to the present day. Many of the American and British artists, innovators, and industry names of the Rock music phenomenon will be discussed, as well as music's reflections on and reactions to events in our society. Musical styles discussed include Tin Pan Alley, Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Gospel, Rockabilly, Country and Western, and Jazz, and their contributions toward the many different stylistic subcategories that have emerged under the umbrella of Rock music.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
MUS 311
History of Jazz 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

This course will enable students to trace the musical, stylistic, and societal impact of Jazz music from its origins around 1900 in New Orleans to the present day. Many of the most important musical artists, composers, stylistic periods, and stylistic subcategories that have emerged since the beginning of Jazz will be discussed.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
NUR 101
Introduction to Nursing 2 HOUR (2-0-0); BSN

This course is an introduction to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Prelicensure program. It is designed to introduce the student to essential academic, interpersonal, and critical thinking skills required for success in nursing school. Academic expectations, role of the professional nurse, and core nursing concepts will be introduced in this course. Additionally, in this course the student will gain knowledge essential to the role of a patient care tech. 

2
NUR 105
Nursing Drugs and Solutions: A Dimensional Analysis Approach 2 HOURS (2-0-0); AASN, BSN

Designed as an elective, supplemental course, Nursing 105 provides instruction and practice in basic mathematics and basic to advanced drug and solution calculations utilizing a dimensional analysis approach. Instruction will include faculty lecture, small group assignments, and individual homework. The course is offered over a five-week period, mid semester.

prerequisite(s): Intermediate Algebra

2
NUR 110
Introduction to the Profession of Nursing 4 HOURS (2-1.3-0.7); AASN

The initial course in the nursing curriculum is designed as an introduction to nursing through historical development and current trends. Students in this basic course examine the organizational framework of the nursing program with focus on Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing. The concepts of the nursing process, Health/Illness Continuum, Teaching/Learning, Role of the Nurse, Scientific Rationale, Interpersonal Skills, Ethical/Legal Implications, and Basic Pharmacokinetics are discussed. The roles of the Associate Degree Nurse are examined in light of healthcare trends. The Nursing 110 course includes instruction and practice in basic care skills necessary to care for adult patients. A portion of the course involves independent study of medical terminology and drug/solutions. Skills include measurement, evaluation, and recording of vital signs; general hygiene; body mechanics; comfort and safety measures; physical assessment, and prevention of hazards of immobility. Concepts of sterile technique are presented with wound care and urinary catheterization. Practice hours are scheduled in the nursing skills lab. After successful completion of skill evaluation in the laboratory setting, the student is assigned to care for selected patients in the clinical area.

4
NUR 112
Universal Self-Care Requisites I 5 HOURS (3-0.7-1.3); AASN

This course examines current trends in healthcare and the impact of managed care on the role of the nurse. Universal self-care requisite areas of balance between activity and rest, prevention of hazards to human life, functioning and well-being, maintaining sufficient intake of air, food, water and promoting social interaction are explored. Emphasis is on nursing interventions for, special senses, fluid and electrolyte balance, ABG's, inflammation, infection, care of patients with musculoskeletal disorders, immunity, and the perioperative experience. Skills include medication administration and peripheral intravenous therapy. Clinical practice complements theory presented. 

prerequisite(s): Anatomy and Physiology I English Composition I Introduction to the Profession of Nursing

5
NUR 122
Universal Self-Care Requisites II 3 HOURS (2-0.25-0.75); AASN

The focus of this course is on developmental self-care requisites of the middle to older adult. Concepts, principles, and therapeutic self-care demands of these developmental age groups are discussed. The universal self-care requisites of air, food, water, elimination processes, prevention of hazards, and normalcy are reinforced throughout the course. Emphasis is on nursing interventions necessary to maintain health in patients with acute and/or chronic alterations in elimination and abnormal cellular proliferation. Skills include nasogastric/nasopharyngeal suctioning and intermittent/continuous tube feedings. Clinical practice complements theory presented.

prerequisite(s): Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II English Composition I English Composition II Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Introduction to Psychology

3
NUR 123
Integration of Self-Care Requisites I 3 HOURS (2-0.2-0.8); AASN

The focus of this course includes self-care agency, the developmental self-care requisites, and the universal self-care requisites of solitude, social interaction, and normalcy of individuals and groups. Emphasis is placed on the concepts and principles of the therapeutic relationship and mental health interventions. The legal, ethical, spiritual, social, and cultural aspects of mental healthcare are examined. Clinical experiences are in acute care and community environments.

prerequisite(s): Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II English Composition I English Composition II Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Introduction to Psychology

3
NUR 232
Integration of Self-Care Requisites II 5 HOURS (3-0.3-1.7); AASN

This course includes the self-care agency of chronically ill patients in both the acute care and community setting. Universal self-care requisites and developmental requisites are explored in light of existing or newly diagnosed health deviations. Promoting the health and well-being of these patients is done through the use of the nursing process, patient education, and therapeutic communication. The legal, ethical, spiritual, social, and cultural dimensions of chronic health deviations are examined. Clinical experiences are in acute care and community settings.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Universal Self-Care Requisites II Integration of Self-Care Requisites I

5
NUR 233
Developmental Self-Care Requisites 4 HOURS (3-0-1); AASN

This course focuses on life stages of childbearing and childrearing families. Concepts, principles, and therapeutic self-care demands of these families are explored. Focus is on the developmental self-care requisites and health deviations of the individual patient and family. Self-care deficits and therapeutic nursing interventions of the obstetrical and pediatric patient are discussed with emphasis on health promotion. Promoting the health and well-being of patients is accomplished through use of the nursing process, patient education, and therapeutic communication. Skills include newborn, child, antepartum, and postpartum assessments. Clinical experiences complement theory presented.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Universal Self-Care Requisites II Integration of Self-Care Requisites I Lifespan Psychology

4
NUR 239
Integration of Self-Care Requisites III 6 HOURS (4-0.4-1.6); AASN

This is the exit course in the curriculum and is designed to prepare the student for entry-level nursing practice. The course focuses on the concepts, principles, and skills necessary in the nursing management of acutely ill clients across the life span with multiple deficits. The clinical component focuses on the concepts, principles, and skills necessary in the nursing management of acutely ill patients with multiple self-care deficits. A key component is for the student to use critical thinking in the process of problem solving and decision-making.

prerequisite(s): Microbiology Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Universal Self-Care Requisites II Integration of Self-Care Requisites I Integration of Self-Care Requisites II Developmental Self-Care Requisites Lifespan Psychology

6
NUR 243
Transition to Practice 1 HOUR (1-0-0); AASN

The theoretical content of the course includes an introduction to leadership/management concepts and styles, current issues affecting the delivery of nursing care, development of nurse agency and the role of manager of care, communication and group dynamics, and the characteristics of healthcare delivery.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Universal Self-Care Requisites II Integration of Self-Care Requisites I Integration of Self-Care Requisites II Developmental Self-Care Requisites

1
NUR 244
Clinical Practicum 2 HOURS (0-0-2); AASN

The student manages the nursing care of a group of clients, examines the dynamics of healthcare delivery, and acts as a member of the healthcare team. This course offers a concentrated clinical practicum as the student's last clinical experience in the nursing program. This course is awarded a Pass/Fall performance/grade.   

prerequisite(s): Mathematical Formulas, Models, and Probability Introduction to Statistics Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Universal Self-Care Requisites II Integration of Self-Care Requisites I Integration of Self-Care Requisites II Developmental Self-Care Requisites Transition to Practice Microbiology Microbiology Laboratory Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory Anatomy and Physiology II Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory Pathophysiology English Composition I English Composition II Introduction to Psychology Lifespan Psychology Medical Ethics Integration of Self-Care Requisites III

2
NUR 245
Introduction to Critical Care Nursing Skills 2 HOURS (1.5-0.5-0); BSN

This elective course builds upon previously learned knowledge while building technical skills using critical thinking principles for the care of the high acuity adult patient. Participants will demonstrate an increased understanding and ability using the necessary technical skills related to high-risk patients, assessment and interventions of the acutely ill patient through the use of classroom theory, case scenarios, and hands on simulation.

prerequisite(s): Population Health Concepts II

2
NUR 246
Clinical Practicum 1 HOURS (0-0-1); AASN

The student manages the nursing care of a group of clients, examines the dynamics of healthcare delivery, and acts as a member of the healthcare team. This course offers a concentrated clinical practicum as the student's last clinical experience in the nursing program. Pass/Fail grade option only.   

prerequisite(s): Mathematical Formulas, Models, and Probability Introduction to Statistics Introduction to the Profession of Nursing Universal Self-Care Requisites I Universal Self-Care Requisites II Integration of Self-Care Requisites I Integration of Self-Care Requisites II Developmental Self-Care Requisites Transition to Practice

1
NUR 251
Concepts of Professional Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Pre-licensure program is required to enroll in this course. BSN

This course is designed to be the initial course in the nursing curriculum and introduces nursing through historical development and current trends. The roles of the baccalaureate nurse are examined in light of current healthcare trends. This course will also include strategies that enhance academic performance and achieving efficient learning. Topics will include learning styles, critical thinking, test-taking skills, review of NCLEX test plan, medical terminology, and how to read a nursing textbook.

3
NUR 252
Nursing Skills and Assessment 5 HOURS (3-2-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Pre-licensure program is required to enroll in this course. BSN

This course is designed as preparatory for the nursing clinical curriculum. This course emphasizes the dimensions of collecting data relevant to health status. It provides opportunities for learning to use the tools and skills of data assessment in the nursing skills lab. Content includes concepts involving assessment, caring interventions, and technical skills. This course explores the gender, physical, and cultural aspects of physical assessment.

5
NUR 256
Fundamental Nursing Concepts 8 HOUR (5-2-1); Admission to the BS Nursing Pre-licensure program is required to enroll in this course. BSN

This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts of professional nursing practice. Students begin to use assessment skills and the nursing process as a foundation for clinical judgement. Emphasis is placed on provision of safe, evidence-based, and holistic nursing care. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide opportunities for development of fundamental nursing skills and competencies.

8
NUR 259
Pharmacology Nursing Concepts 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course focuses on pharmacotherapeutics across the lifespan with an emphasis on best practice and legal and ethical implications. Students will use the nursing process to develop a comprehensive approach to safe medication administration.

3
NUR 290
Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology 1 HOUR (1-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Pre-licensure program is required to enroll in this course. BSN

This course provides the BSN Pre-licensure student with an introduction to pharmacological concepts, laws and regulations, and error prevention strategies. It builds the nurse's role in the safe administration of medications using nursing assessment, nursing implications, and patient education. The study of drugs in broad classifications including over-the-counter drugs and herbal supplements along with ethical and legal issues, and the influence of culture and age on drug therapy is introduced.

1
NUR 302
Professional Nursing I 3 HOURS (2-0.2-0.8); BSN

Professional Nursing I is the first of a series of four courses that focus on professional attributes, core roles, and the context in which nurses practice. Concepts covered in this introductory course include spirituality, patient education, self-management, communication, safety, healthcare law, professional identity, and clinical judgment. The clinical portion of Professional Nursing I will allow students to explore the course concepts on a nursing unit while providing basic care to patients.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

3
NUR 303
Professional Nursing II 3 HOURS (2-0.27-0.73); BSN

This is course two of four courses that focus on professional attributes, core roles, and the context in which nurses practice. Concepts covered in this course include ethics, technology and informatics, culture, collaboration, palliative care, and family-based practice. The clinical portion of Professional Nursing II will allow students to explore the course concepts while working with nursing professionals in various hospital-based settings.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing I Pharmacology for Nursing I Population Health Concepts I Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare

3
NUR 304
Transitions in Professional Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This course provides an overview of the distance-learning program and the college course management software used to deliver courses. The course is intended to enhance student success by orienting them to strategies and resources for online learning as well as Mercy College policy and procedure. This course initiates the transition from associate degree or diploma-based nursing practice to the baccalaureate degree nurse. Recurrent themes are philosophy of nursing, nursing theory, critical thinking, application of nursing research, standards of practice, and continuity of care over time and setting.

3
NUR 305
Level 3 Standardized Testing Preparation 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course provides an opportunity for students to refine test-taking skills and review content from the first and second semesters of the nursing program. Students will develop an individualized plan with faculty to improve standardized test scores in preparation for the NCLEX-RN.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing I Pharmacology for Nursing I Population Health Concepts I

2
NUR 311
Pharmacology for Nursing I 1 HOUR (1-0-0); BSN

This course provides the BSN Pre-licensure student with an introduction to pharmacological concepts. The nurse's role in the safe administration of medications is the primary focus of the course. Drug therapy with an emphasis on nursing assessment, nursing implications, and patient education is explored. The role of the nurse in light of ethical and legal issues and the influence of culture and age are examined. Drugs are studied in broad classifications using prototypes and the nursing process.

prerequisite(s): Pathophysiology Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

1
NUR 312
Pharmacology for Nursing II 1 HOUR (1-0-0); BSN

This course provides the BSN Pre-licensure student with information related to pharmacological concepts in the areas of fluid and electrolyte balances, perfusion, mobility, oxygenation, metabolism, sensory perception, development, reproduction, and sexuality. The nurse's role in the safe administration of medications is analyzed using nursing assessment, nursing implications, and patient education across diverse populations.

prerequisite(s): Pharmacology for Nursing I Professional Nursing I Population Health Concepts I Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare

1
NUR 316
Clinical Nursing Concepts I 8 HOURS (4-1-3); BSN

This is the first course in a series of four courses with an emphasis on care of individuals and families. Key content includes perioperative and end-of-life nursing care and care of individuals and families with alterations in protection, regulation, metabolism, and perception. Clinical practice experiences provide opportunities to integrate the concepts presented throughout the course in the clinical setting.

prerequisite(s): Fundamental Nursing Concepts Pharmacology Nursing Concepts

8
NUR 318
Professional Nursing Concepts I 4 HOURS (4-0-0); BSN

This is the first course in a series of four courses on the professional roles and responsibilities of the nurse within the complex healthcare system. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in providing ethical and evidence-based nursing care. Key content includes professional nursing roles and responsibilities, ethical practice, professional communication, evidence-based practice, and self-awareness in the delivery of nursing care.

prerequisite(s): Fundamental Nursing Concepts Pharmacology Nursing Concepts

4
NUR 324
Nursing Informatics 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This course focuses on an introduction to the role of a nurse in informatics as it relates to the delivery of healthcare services. An emphasis will be placed on educational requirements, patient safety, evidence-based practice, information management, legal and ethical issues, teamwork, and patient support systems in the field of nursing informatics.

prerequisite(s): Transitions in Professional Nursing

3
NUR 326
Clinical Nursing Concepts II 8 HOURS (4-1-3); BSN

This is the second of four courses with an emphasis on care of individuals and families. Key content includes health promotion and disease prevention across the lifespan. Key concepts include holistic care, nutrition, oxygenation, perfusion, reproduction, and sexuality. Clinical practice experiences provide opportunities to care for children, childbearing families, and adults.

prerequisite(s): Clinical Nursing Concepts I Professional Nursing Concepts I

8
NUR 328
Professional Nursing Concepts II 5 HOURS (4-0-1); BSN

This is the second course in a series of four courses on the professional roles and responsibilities of the nurse within the complex healthcare system. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in health promotion and disease prevention across healthcare contexts. Key content includes an introduction to public health, primary care and care models, and social determinants of health. Clinical practice experience will provide opportunities to care for individuals and families in the primary care setting.

prerequisite(s): Clinical Nursing Concepts I Professional Nursing Concepts I

5
NUR 335
Population Health Concepts I 5 HOURS (3-0.4-1.6); BSN

This is the first course in a series of four courses and serves as an introduction to nursing through current trends. Content includes concepts involving comfort, illness, infection, self and thermoregulation, tissue integrity, and elimination. Concepts related to evidence-based practice, critical thinking, caring, communication, and the nursing process are integrated within the course. Clinical practice provides experiences to compliment the concepts presented throughout the course.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

5
NUR 345
Population Health Concepts II 5 HOURS (3-0.13-1.87); BSN

This is the second of four courses involving concepts associated with an individual's physical health and illness that require nursing care. Concept categories include fluid & electrolytes, perfusion, mobility, oxygenation, metabolism, sensory perception, development, sexuality, and reproduction. This course will utilize the nursing process, evidence-based practice, caring, therapeutic communication, and critical thinking to guide therapeutic nursing interventions.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing I Pharmacology for Nursing I Population Health Concepts I Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare

5
NUR 351
Introduction to Advanced Practice Nursing Roles 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course focuses on current and emerging issues affecting advanced practice nursing roles. An emphasis will be placed on historical, political, legal, ethical, technological advances, and economic factors that impact the role of the advanced practice nurse.

prerequisite(s): Population Health Concepts II

2
NUR 352
Introduction to Forensic Nursing 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course focuses on an introduction to the role of a forensic nurse in the delivery of healthcare services. An emphasis will be placed on educational requirements, patient safety, evidence-based practice, information management, legal and ethical issues, teamwork, and patient support systems in the field of forensic nursing.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

2
NUR 353
Advanced Wound Care Management in Nursing 2 HOURS (1.5-0.5-0); BSN

This course is designed to prepare students to effectively assess and treat acute and chronic wounds. Principles will be based on evidence-based practice while considering the financial, ethical, and legal implications.

prerequisite(s): Population Health Concepts II

2
NUR 354
Nursing Care of the Oncology Patient 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

In this course students have the opportunity to explore an area of interest related to the care of the oncology patients. They will apply basic knowledge about cancer pathophysiology, and nursing management of oncology patients. The course will also emphasize current trends and practices in oncology nursing and issues related to end of life care.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

2
NUR 355
Palliative Care Nursing 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course is designed to enhance the knowledge on current and emerging issues affecting palliative care nursing and the role of the nurse in improving palliative care.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

2
NUR 356
Holistic Nursing 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

Healthcare in the 21st century requires a radically different type of nurse who understands relationship-centered care and human flourishing. Holistic, integral, and integrative nursing along with nurse coaching, are guiding behavioral change strategies, health promotion, health maintenance, and disease prevention. The holistic perspectives and mind-body-spirit strategies provided in this course are fundamental to transforming healthcare globally from a disease model of care to one that focuses on health and wellness.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

2
NUR 357
Gerontological Nursing 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

In this course students have an opportunity to explore a unique area of interest related to the care of the older adult patient. The demand for age appropriate care for the older adult patient population is a growing challenge in healthcare. The student will apply basic knowledge about physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and nursing management of the older adult patient. This course will also explore current trends in the care of the older adult as well as legal and ethical issues related to the care of the older adult.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

2
NUR 358
Clinical Genetics in Nursing Practice 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course is an essential guide specifically for nursing practice. From genetic factors and trends affecting health care today, to the more complex discussions of human variation, every genetic topic critical to the practice of nursing and nursing education is covered, including prevention of genetic disease, genetic testing and treatment, genetic counseling, maternal-child nursing, psychiatric/mental health nursing, community/public health nursing, and trends, policies, and social and ethical issues.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

2
NUR 359
Essentials of Primary Care Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); BSN, BSNC

The focus in Essentials of Primary Care Nursing will be to demonstrate the influence that primary care nursing can have on the health outcomes of individuals that encompass vulnerable and underserved populations. Various core competencies of Primary Care Nursing and Public Health Nursing Standards of practice are highlighted throughout the course to prepare the nurse generalist entering practice with a primary care focus. Facets of primary care nursing will be explored such as the core principles of primary care nursing, the vast roles of the primary care nurse, the importance of inter-professional collaboration within primary care nursing in addressing the mental health and social needs of patients, care management and coordination, and the role of technology within the scope of primary care nursing.

prerequisite(s): Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

3
NUR 374
Population Health Assessment 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This course focuses beyond the physical assessment and includes a comprehensive examination of other health parameters and health behaviors of the adult and older adult patient. Physical, cultural, psychosocial, spiritual, environmental, genomic, nutritional, health-beliefs, and lifestyle variables will be examined through the use of a health history and health assessment of the adult and older adult. Individual models to promote health behaviors will be discussed. Planning and interventions for health promotion and prevention for the adult and older adult patient will be explored.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
NUR 380
Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and Healthcare 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Pre-licensure Program is required to enroll in this course. BSN

This course provides an introduction to concepts, issues, and processes in nursing research. Emphasis is on the research role, critical analysis, and evaluation of published research in nursing practice. Emphasis based on evidence-based practice and dissemination of research findings in practice.

prerequisite(s): Introduction to Statistics Concepts of Professional Nursing Nursing Skills and Assessment Introduction to Nursing Pharmacology

3
NUR 384
Evidence-Based Practice 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This course provides an introduction to concepts, issues, and processes in nursing research. Emphasis is on the research role, critical analysis, and evaluation of published research in nursing practice. Emphasis based on evidence-based practice and dissemination of research findings in practice.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
NUR 399
Special Topics in Nursing: 3 HOURS (3-0-0); The course can be repeated for credit if topics differ.

This course will focus on a selected nursing topic.

3
NUR 402
Professional Nursing III 3 HOURS (2-0.13-0.87); BSN

This is course three of four courses that focus on professional attributes, core roles, and the context in which nurses practice. Concepts covered in this course are related to nursing in the community, and include caregiving, disaster preparedness, quality, care coordination, adherence, and health disparities. The clinical portion of Professional Nursing III will allow students to explore the course concepts while working with nursing professionals in various community-based healthcare settings.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing II Pharmacology for Nursing II Population Health Concepts II

3
NUR 403
Professional Nursing IV 4 HOURS (2- 0.13 -1.87); BSN

This is course four of four courses that focus on professional attributes, core roles, and the context in which nurses practice. Concepts covered in this course focus on leadership and include leadership, health policy, health care law, health care organizations, healthcare economics, and communication. In addition, this course will cover special topics such as role transition and career management in order to prepare graduates for entry into the workforce. The clinical portion of Professional Nursing IV will be a clinical practicum which includes time spent with nurse leaders and managers and working one-on-one in the inpatient setting with a dedicated nurse preceptor.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing III Pharmacology for Nursing III Population Health Concepts III

4
NUR 405
Level 4 Standardized Testing Preparation 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course provides an opportunity for students to refine test-taking skills and review content from the first and second semesters of the nursing program. Students will develop an individualized plan with faculty to improve standardized test scores in preparation for the NCLEX-RN.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing II Pharmacology for Nursing II Population Health Concepts II

2
NUR 411
Pharmacology for Nursing III 1 HOUR (1-0-0); BSN

This course provides the BSN Pre-licensure student with an advanced ideation to pharmacological concepts in the areas of inflammation, immunity, elimination, metabolism, self, violence, stress and coping, mood and affect, and cognition. The nurse's role in the safe administration of medications is developed using nursing assessment, nursing implications, and patient education to address populations with mental health concerns.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing II Pharmacology for Nursing II Population Health Concepts II

1
NUR 413
Pharmacology for Nursing IV 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course provides the BSN Pre-licensure student with an advanced ideation to pharmacological concepts in the areas of oxygenation, perfusion, tissue integrity, cellular regulation, acid-base, thermoregulation, immunity, intracranial regulation, and fluid and electrolytes. The nurse's role in the safe administration of medications is formulated using nursing assessment, nursing implications, and patient education in patient populations with complex healthcare needs.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing III Pharmacology for Nursing III Population Health Concepts III

2
NUR 414
Current Issues in Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This course addresses the nursing profession, the environment and nursing practice, the person in health care, and health and nursing issues. The essentials of information given are intended to provide the nurse with the necessary details to think critically about issues and trends in nursing, engage in relationships with clients within an informed context of the issues and their environment, and create therapeutic plans to improve health outcomes.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Transitions in Professional Nursing Nursing Informatics Population Health Assessment Evidence-Based Practice

3
NUR 416
Clinical Nursing Concepts III 8 HOURS (4-1-3); BSN

This is the third of four courses with an emphasis on care of individuals and families with physical and/or psychological alterations. Key concepts include regulation, metabolism, nutrition, elimination, protection, perfusion, mobility, perception, cognition, and mood. Clinical practice experiences provide opportunities to integrate the concepts presented throughout the course in medical-surgical and mental health settings.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing Concepts II

8
NUR 418
Professional Nursing Concepts III 5 HOURS (4-1-0); BSN

This is the third course in a series of four courses on the professional roles and responsibilities of the nurse within the complex healthcare system. Emphasis is on the role of the nurse in population health. Key content includes integration of evidence-based practice, health promotion, disease prevention, and cultural competency in care of communities and populations. Clinical practice experience will provide opportunities to assess and care for communities and populations.

prerequisite(s): Clinical Nursing Concepts II Professional Nursing Concepts II

5
NUR 426
Clinical Nursing Concepts IV 7 HOURS (3-0-4); BSN

This is the fourth and final course that addresses care of individuals and families with complex health needs. The course builds on concepts introduced in previous courses. Through integration of nursing concepts and the nursing process, students use clinical judgement to provide safe, effective care in high-acuity nursing environments. Students will also assimilate into the nursing role through a precepted clinical immersion experience.

prerequisite(s): Clinical Nursing Concepts III Professional Nursing Concepts III

7
NUR 428
Professional Nursing Concepts IV 3 HOURS (3-0-0); BSN

This is the fourth course in a series of four courses on the professional roles and responsibilities of the nurse within the complex healthcare system. Emphasis is on nursing leadership and serving as an active member of the nursing profession. Key content includes synthesis and planning of evidence- based practice improvements and evaluation of health policies, laws, leadership styles, informatics, and healthcare technologies.

prerequisite(s): Clinical Nursing Concepts I Professional Nursing Concepts I

3
NUR 434
Community Health Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This course will provide an overview of the theoretical and practical basis for community-oriented population-nursing practice. Promoting and protecting the health of the public utilizing health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management control strategies will be addressed with a special focus on vulnerable populations and persons.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Transitions in Professional Nursing Nursing Informatics Population Health Assessment Evidence-Based Practice

3
NUR 435
Population Health Concepts III 5 HOURS (3-0.27-1.73); BSN

This is the third of four courses involving concepts associated with an individual's physical health and illness that require nursing care. Concept categories include inflammation, immunity, elimination, metabolism, self, violence, stress and coping, mood and affect, cognition, nursing process, caring, evidence-based practice, communication, and critical thinking.

prerequisite(s): Pharmacology for Nursing II Professional Nursing II Population Health Concepts II

5
NUR 444
Global Focused Nursing Care 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This course addresses global and population focused health promotion, and disease and injury prevention based on determinants of local, national, and global health including lifestyle, environmental, cultural, and genetic factors. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to global and population focused nursing care. A major focus of this course is for students to critically think about and discuss health and nursing care within a global environment. Nursing students will be exposed to health disparities that exist in the United States and countries around the world. Students will be provided with information and tools that nurses can use to confront health care challenges. Emphasis will be placed on helping to improve the health of vulnerable persons and populations. The course synthesizes theory, research, and practice related to global and population focused nursing care, with emphasis on health promotion of aggregates across the lifespan.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Transitions in Professional Nursing Nursing Informatics Population Health Assessment Evidence-Based Practice

3
NUR 445
Population Health Concepts IV 5 HOURS (3-0.31-1.69); BSN

This is the fourth course in a series of four courses involving concepts associated with an individual's physical health and illness that require nursing care. Concept categories include oxygenation, perfusion, tissue integrity, cellular regulation, acid-base balance, thermoregulation, immunity, intracranial regulation, and fluid and electrolyte balance. Emphasis is also placed on synthesizing knowledge and managing care for patients with complex and multi-system health issues. Concepts related to evidence-based practice, critical thinking, caring, communication, and the nursing process are integrated within the course. Clinical practice provides experiences to compliment the theories presented throughout the course.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing III Pharmacology for Nursing III Population Health Concepts III

5
NUR 481
NCLEX-RN Preparation 2 HOURS (2-0-0); BSN

This course is designed to prepare the student for taking the NCLEX-RN Examination. The emphasis of the course is to assist the student in planning for success on the NCLEX-RN Exam. The course includes strategies for coping with test anxiety, improving test-taking skills, building confidence, and creating a focused individual study plan in preparation for taking the NCLEX-RN Exam.

prerequisite(s): Professional Nursing III Pharmacology for Nursing III Population Health Concepts III

2
NUR 491
RN to MSN Bridge Course 3 HOURS (3-0-0); BSNC

The purpose of this course is to provide a RN-MSN Bridge Course at the Undergraduate level to complement the RN-MSN Completion Program. The purpose of developing this course is to take the last three courses in the BSN-C Program and create a 3 credit hour Bridge Course which will combine the objectives and components of NUR 434, NUR 444, & NUR 494. The content of these three courses combined will allow the student to complete the BSN-Completion Core Course content in order to progress to the MSN Curriculum.

prerequisite(s): Transitions in Professional Nursing Nursing Informatics Population Health Assessment Evidence-Based Practice Current Issues in Nursing

3
NUR 494
Nursing Leadership 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the BS Nursing Completion program (RN-to-BSN) is required to enroll in this course. BSNC

This nursing leadership course builds on past knowledge of leadership roles and management functions. The nurse will further explore key management components and leadership theories necessary for nursing care delivery in the 21st century. The coursework focuses on theory and application concepts of planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and managing in nursing practice. A project component focuses on incorporating the key management and leadership concepts into daily clinical practice in a healthcare setting.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Transitions in Professional Nursing Nursing Informatics Population Health Assessment Evidence-Based Practice

3
NUR 495
Essentials of Palliative Care Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); BSNC

Essentials of Palliative Care Nursing is an elective nursing course developed to prepare nurses to provide palliative patient and family centered care that optimizes quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering. This palliative care course addresses illness throughout the life span which includes the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and spiritual needs and patient autonomy, access to information, and choice.

3
NUR 496
Essentials of Holistic Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); BSNC

Essentials of Holistic Care Nursing is an elective nursing course developed to prepare nurses to integrate current Holistic Care practices into patient plans of care. The course enables the nurse to apply the principles of Holism and interconnectedness through interdisciplinary collaboration.

3
NUR 497
Essentials of Gerontological Nursing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); BSNC

This course will examine current trends in the care of the older adult including effective communication, safety concerns and medication use considerations. Legal and ethical issues related to the care of the older adult will also be explored. The student will apply his or her knowledge about physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and nursing management of the older adult patient.

3
NUR 498
Essentials of Genetics in Nursing Practice 3 HOURS (3-0-0); BSNC

Essentials of Genetics in Nursing Practice is an elective nursing course developed to prepare nurses to integrate genetics into the patient's plan of care. Including but not limited to, prevention of genetic disease, genetic testing and treatment, genetic counseling, maternal-child nursing, psychiatric/mental health nursing, community/public health nursing, trends, policies, and social and ethical issues.

3
PHS 220
College Physics I 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

Includes in-depth algebra and trigonometry-based presentation of physics, emphasizing physical principles, problem solving, and laboratory experiences. Involves a study of translational and angular kinematics, forces, impulse-momentum, fluids, and heat. Three-hour lecture and a three-hour lab.

4
PHS 221
College Physics II 4 HOURS (3-1-0); GNST

Continues the topics of PHS 210 and includes an in-depth, algebra and trigonometry-based presentation of physics, emphasizing physical principles, problem solving, and laboratory experiences. Involves a study of electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, and atomic physics. Three-hour lecture and a three-hour lab.

prerequisite(s): College Physics I

4
POL 301
Women and Politics 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course is designed to explore women's roles, impact, and participation in politics. The primary concentration of the course will be American, with secondary focus on international comparisons.

3
PSG 101
Fundamentals of Sleep 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course emphasizes the biological and neurological systems that control sleep and wake in humans, the development of sleep over the life cycle, the function of sleep, consequences of sleep deprivation, and the various pathologies that lead to sleep disorders. The course will also address the process, function, and content of dreaming from a neurological and psychological perspective.

3
PSG 102
Essentials of Polysomnographic Technology 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

This course will cover the basic duties of a PSG technologist beginning with patient preparation, monitoring, and completing a sleep study. Additional focus will be given to issues concerning professionalism, ethical behavior, patient safety, confidentiality, safety, and infection control. This course also contains mandatory lab time. Lab time will contain specific instruction on patient hook-up, monitoring, and quality control. During this time, the 10-20 placement of EEG sensors as well as basic EMG, EKG, and respiratory sensor placement will be covered. In-depth instruction on patient monitoring, troubleshooting, and responding to medical emergencies will also be covered during the lab portion.

3
PSG 110
Polysomnography Analysis 3 HOURS (1-2-0)

This is a course on scoring adult and pediatric PSGs including staging, respiratory events, periodic limb movements, artifact recognition, and atypical PSG activity. Protocols for PSG report generation, as well as MSLT and MWT reports will be covered.

prerequisite(s): Fundamentals of Sleep Essentials of Polysomnographic Technology

3
PSG 111
Respiratory Monitoring 3 HOURS (1.5-1.5-0)

This course will review basic respiratory physiology as well as monitoring techniques used during the PSG. The basic electrical/mechanical principles of respiratory monitoring equipment will be presented. The second part of the course will deal specifically with Positive Airway Pressure titrations and modalities (e.g. CPAP, BPAP, BPAP ST, and Adaptive Ventilation) and PSG oxygen titration.

prerequisite(s): Fundamentals of Sleep Essentials of Polysomnographic Technology Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology

3
PSG 113
Polysomnographic Practicum I 1 HOUR (0-0-1)

Students will review orders, history and physical characteristics of patients, conduct patient assessments and orientations, organize PSG equipment, perform hook-up procedures, calibrate PSG equipment, perform documentation and monitoring, and participate in event recognition.

prerequisite(s): Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology Fundamentals of Sleep Essentials of Polysomnographic Technology

1
PSG 123
Advanced Topics in Polysomnographic Technology 3 HOURS (3-0-0)

This course is divided into three primary categories: 1) Advanced Assessment of Sleep Disorders; 2) Pediatric Sleep and Polysomnography; and 3) Therapeutics and Interventions for Sleep Disorders. From a technical perspective, the course broadens the student's skill set to include alternative testing conducted in a Sleep Center beyond a standard PSG and extends their skills into the area of sleep studies with children. The last section of the course moves beyond the diagnostics of sleep, and into the treatment phase of sleep services.

prerequisite(s): Fundamentals of Sleep Essentials of Polysomnographic Technology Polysomnography Analysis Respiratory Monitoring

3
PSG 124
Polysomnographic Technology Capstone Seminar 2 HOURS (2-0-0)

This course explores a variety of concepts focusing on professional aspects of a Polysomnographic Technologist. Topics such as certification and continuing education, values, personal excellence, self-assessment, discussion of current trends and case studies, and the overall promotion of the field of Sleep Medicine will be addressed.

prerequisite(s): Fundamentals of Sleep Essentials of Polysomnographic Technology Polysomnography Analysis Respiratory Monitoring Polysomnographic Practicum I

2
PSG 125
Polysomnographic Practicum II 2 HOURS (0-0-2)

Students will review orders, history and physical characteristics of patients, conduct patient assessments and orientations, organize PSG equipment, perform hook-up procedures, calibrate PSG equipment, perform documentation and monitoring, and participate in event recognition. Students will also gain hands on experience in the following areas: PAP training, titration, and end of study procedures.

prerequisite(s): Fundamentals of Sleep Essentials of Polysomnographic Technology Polysomnography Analysis Respiratory Monitoring Polysomnographic Practicum I

2
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This introductory course includes a survey of the various fields of study comprising modern scientific psychology. It examines the theories, basic research findings, and applications in each of the major areas of psychology. The course utilizes a scientific perspective in examining the different processes that govern psychological phenomena and behavior. Some of the topics covered are the biological basis of behavior, perception, learning and thinking, memory, personality, and psychopathology.

3
PSY 201
Lifespan Psychology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course is designed to examine the scientific knowledge of human development as it unfolds across the lifespan from birth to old age. The major developmental theories and research findings are explored providing insight and understanding of the biological, cognitive, and social factors associated with development. Central themes of the course focus on physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of the individual.

3
PSY 280
Independent Study 1-3 HOURS ((1-3)-0-0); GSBS

Supervised independent work in psychology designed to meet approved objectives/learner outcomes. Student must meet specific criteria and present the instructor with a detailed written proposal. Written approval must be obtained from the instructor and dean. Up to three hours of credit will be awarded.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I Introduction to Psychology

1-3
PSY PSY 310
Brain and Behavior <span style=''background-color: #ffffff; color: #231f20;''>3 HOURS (3-0-0)</span>

The goal of this course is to provide an understanding of the brain and its influence over behavior. Structure and function of the nervous system, neural communication, and neural mechanisms of higher nervous system functions and dysfunctions will be covered. Topics include: biological basis of learning, memory, eating, sleep, sex, personality, language, and various psychological disorders.

3
PSY 320
Social Psychology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course addresses the various ways that people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Major research findings regarding the self, attitudes, gender, social influence, prejudice and stereotyping, altruism and aggression, and interpersonal relationships are explored. The application of course material is emphasized through student-conducted research and the study of how social psychology is used in settings such as the clinic and the courtroom.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Introduction to Psychology

3
PSY 340
Abnormal Psychology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course examines the major behavioral, cognitive, developmental, and emotional disorders from a scientific perspective. The areas covered include symptomatology, assessment, causes, and treatment methods. Both historical and current views of the definition and treatment of mental illness are explored, as are ethical and legal issues relating to mental illness. Topics include personality, anxiety, mood, schizophrenia, and eating disorders.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Introduction to Psychology

3
PSY 350
Interpersonal Relationships 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course will introduce the student to the foundations of interpersonal relationships. The major focus will be on the application of the principles of cultivating and maintaining healthy relationships with others. Topics include attraction, communication, friendship, love, power, and conflict resolution.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Introduction to Psychology

3
PSY 370
Psychology of Music 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the ways in which various psychological principles apply to the experience of music. Major research findings regarding the psychology of music, nature and nurture's role in the development of musical ability, musical tastes, and preferences, and social issues in music will be presented. An eclectic variety of music will be explored, including music from many different cultures.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Introduction to Psychology

3
PSY 380
Behavior Modification 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course provides an introduction to advanced behavioral modification techniques for use in applied settings such as hospital, schools, and business and industry. The major focus of this course will be on the application of classical and operant conditioning principles for the purpose of identification of behavioral contingencies, the implementation of behavior modification programs, and program assessments.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Introduction to Psychology

3
PSY 390
Forensic Psychology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course is designed to give students an introduction and overview of the field of forensic psychology as used in a wide range of law enforcement settings. Topics to be covered are the history of the field, psychological principles influential in the courtroom, antisocial behavior, criminal profiling, and crime scene investigation. A particular emphasis will be placed on applying course concepts in reviewing actual cases.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Introduction to Psychology

3
PSY 399
Special Topics in Psychology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

During various semesters throughout the academic year, special topics in psychology will be presented. Past topics include Interpersonal Relationships and The Psychology of Music.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II Introduction to Psychology

3
PSY 420
Classic and Contemporary Research in Social Psychology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course provides an in-depth, intensive study of the major areas of Social Psychology. The historical and modern methods used to do research will be examined. The seminal studies in the field are explored, followed by an examination of contemporary studies that have followed. A strong focus of the course will be the utilization of applied, critical analyses of the covered material. Topics covered include: Conformity and Obedience, The Power of the Situation, Judgment and Decision-Making, Conflict, Attraction, Persuasion, Altruism, and Prejudice and Stereotyping.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I Introduction to Psychology

3
RAD 105
Radiography Fundamentals and Patient Care 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Admission to the AAS Radiologic Technology program or Program Director Approval is required to enroll in this course.

This course will introduce the student to the field of radiologic technology. Topics will include an overview of radiographic equipment, radiation protection, basic patient care skills, infection control, professional organizations, and ethical and legal issues in the field of radiologic technology.

3
RAD 111
Radiography Practicum I 2 HOURS (1-0-1); Admission to the AAS Radiologic Technology program or Program Director Approval is required to enroll in this course.

This course will introduce the student to the clinical facility and radiology department. Emphasis will be placed on department workflow, patient care skills, and clinical application of radiographic approaches. Students will observe, assist, and perform basic radiographic procedures. A series of clinically related lectures regarding communication, supervision, and safety will be presented prior to the student entering the clinical environment.

2
RAD 115
Radiographic Procedures I 4 HOURS (3-1-0)

This course is designed to introduce the language of radiography. Basic anatomy and positioning skills for radiographic exams, including the chest and abdomen, upper and lower extremities, and shoulder and pelvic girdles will be emphasized. Students will enhance clinical analysis skills through simulation, image critique, and evaluation.

4
RAD 121
Radiography Practicum II 2 HOURS (0-0-2)

This course is a continuation of clinical application of radiographic positioning and techniques, radiation protection, and radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment operation. Professionalism, values, diversity, and procedural competency under direct supervision will be emphasized.

prerequisite(s): Radiography Practicum I

2
RAD 125
Radiographic Procedures II 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

This course is designed to develop understanding of basic anatomy and positioning skills for radiographic exams, including the spine, bony thorax, and gastrointestinal system. Fundamentals of mobile/surgical procedures and aseptic technique will be introduced. Students will enhance clinical analysis skills through simulation, image critique, and evaluation.

prerequisite(s): Radiographic Procedures I

3
RAD 128
Radiologic Science I 2 HOURS (2-0-0); Admission to the AAS Radiologic Technology program or Program Director Approval is required to enroll in this course.

This course will introduce common radiographic systems and imaging components. Radiation production and image formation, including image quality considerations will be explored. Course topics will include x-ray production, radiation interactions with matter, radiation physics, radiation safety principles, and radiology information and storage systems.

2
RAD 131
Radiography Practicum III 3 HOURS (0-0-3)

This course is a continuation of clinical application of radiographic positioning and techniques, radiation protection, radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment operation, and image evaluation. Communication, patient education, procedural competency under direct supervision, and procedural mastery under indirect supervision will be emphasized.

prerequisite(s): Radiography Practicum II

3
RAD 134
Basic Sectional Anatomy in Medical Imaging 1 HOUR (1-0-0)

This course is designed to develop student knowledge in basic sectional anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Image plane and anatomical structure identification will be the focus. Sectional anatomy images from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed.

prerequisite(s): Anatomy and Physiology II Radiographic Procedures II Radiography Practicum II

1
RAD 138
Radiologic Science II 2 HOURS (1.5-0.5-0)

This course will integrate application of radiographic experiments, demonstrating exposure principles and their effect on radiographic quality. Topics will include radiographic interactions, x-ray circuitry, and timing mechanisms. Students will apply mathematical formulas to correlate radiographic techniques and patient exposure.

prerequisite(s): Radiologic Science I Mathematical Formulas, Models, and Probability

2
RAD 140
Radiographic Pathology 2 HOURS (2-0-0); GAPL

This course is designed to introduce terminology and concepts of radiographic pathologies with an emphasis on radiographic disease appearance. Radiographic pathology of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, reproductive, respiratory, skeletal, and urinary systems will be covered. Basic pharmacology and radiographic contrast media will also be emphasized.

prerequisite(s): Anatomy and Physiology II Medical Terminology Radiographic Procedures II

2
RAD 208
Radiologic Science III 2 HOURS (2-0-0)

This course will further develop comprehension of digital imaging, including image manipulation and storage. Topics will include digital radiography and fluoroscopy equipment in regard to image acquisition, image processing, and image viewing with attention to post-processing capabilities. Quality and data management will be introduced and correlated to patient radiation safety.

prerequisite(s): Radiologic Science II

2
RAD 215
Radiation Biology and Protection 2 HOURS (2-0-0); GAPL

This course will overview molecular and cellular effects of ionizing radiation interactions. Rationale for radiation protection practices for patients, technologists, and others will be emphasized. Topics will include radiation detection and measurement, principles of radiobiology, current radiation protection practices, and legal and regulatory requirements.

prerequisite(s): Radiologic Science III

2
RAD 225
Radiographic Procedures III 3 HOURS (2-1-0)

This course is designed to develop understanding of basic anatomy and radiographic positioning for the skull, facial bones, urinary system, and reproductive system. Additional topics will include trauma radiography, geriatric radiography, pediatric radiography, and special radiographic procedures and projections. Radiographic image evaluation and critical thinking will be emphasized throughout the course.

prerequisite(s): Radiographic Procedures II Radiographic Pathology

3
RAD 241
Radiography Practicum IV 3 HOURS (.5-0-2.5)

This course is a continuation of clinical application of radiographic positioning and techniques, radiation protection, radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment operation, and image evaluation. Advanced imaging modalities, surgical radiography, mobile radiography, procedural competency under direct supervision, and procedural mastery under indirect supervision will be emphasized.

prerequisite(s): Radiography Practicum III

3
RAD 248
Interprofessional Essentials in Radiography 1 HOUR (1-0-0)

This course is designed to integrate principles and concepts of interprofessional collaborative practice into radiologic technology. Emphasis will be placed on values and ethics, roles and responsibilities in a collaborative environment, interprofessional communication, and teams and teamwork in a healthcare environment. Topics and situations relevant to radiologic technology practice standards will be emphasized.

1
RAD 251
Radiography Practicum V 3 HOURS (.5-0-2.5)

This course is a continuation of clinical application of radiographic positioning and techniques, radiation protection, radiographic and fluoroscopic equipment operation, and image evaluation. Radiation safety and procedural mastery under indirect supervision will be emphasized. Students will rotate to an assigned alternate clinical facility.

prerequisite(s): Radiography Practicum IV

3
RAD 280
Radiography Capstone 2 HOURS (2-0-0)

This course is designed to investigate, discuss, and elaborate upon radiologic technology principles and concepts. Emphasis will be placed on review and preparation for the national certification exam in Radiography. Professional development and career skills will also be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Radiologic Science III Radiographic Procedures III Radiography Practicum IV

2
REL 101
Introduction to Theology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course is an examination of faith, religion, and theology. Topics will include foundations in religious faith traditions: theology, Scripture, doctrines, worship practices, spirituality, and social justice, and an historical-critical study of the evolution of Christianity, and the relationship of Christianity to other religions.

3
REL 204
Spirituality for Healthcare Providers 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course is designed to assist the students in their articulation of and reflection on their spiritual values as integrated in both their personal and professional relationships. The history of spiritual practices and persons who exemplified faith-filled lives primarily within the Roman Catholic tradition are explored and studied. This is a process course that provides opportunities for students to participate in a variety of prayer experiences, prayer rituals, reflections, values in art and music, along with discussions designed to enhance the students' spirituality in relationship with personal, professional, and healthcare contexts.

3
REL 211
Introduction to Scripture 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course is an examination of the Old and New Testaments of the Christian Bible, as literature and as evidence of the faith relationship between human persons and God. Topics will include historical, theological, and spiritual context for Biblical literature, literary styles, and interpretation, divisions of Old and New Testament writings, revelation, and salvation history in Scripture.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I

3
REL 250
Death, Dying, and Bereavement 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course is designed to enhance the understanding of death and dying as it relates to human development. The focus of the course is to promote personal and professional growth regarding topics associated with death and dying, loss, grief, and bereavement. Various religious beliefs about the afterlife will also be explored. Participants will discuss topics related to the biological, psychological, cultural, and spiritual dimensions of death.

3
REL 261
Spirituality, Religion, and Healthcare in the United States 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course provides a thorough overview of healthcare in the United States beginning with the Biblical foundation upon which our country was founded. It also discusses non-Christian commitments to healthcare in America. The course addresses religious similarities, differences, and practices that will be encountered in healthcare. Contemporary issues such as the healthcare crisis in America justice, and religious community mergers will be studied. In a personal but respectful way, the course will challenge students to think about their own spiritual and religious beliefs as preparation for becoming excellent caregivers for people of both religious and non-religious backgrounds.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I

3
REL 280
Independent Study 1-5 HOURS ((1-5)-0-0); GAHR

Supervised independent work in religion is designed to meet approved objectives/learner outcomes. Student must meet specific criteria and present the instructor with a detailed written proposal. Written approval must be obtained from the instructor and dean.

1-5
REL 290
Medical Ethics 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

The purpose of this course is to deepen the ethical and moral competence of the student in the healthcare field. Students will learn various ethical theories and principles and apply them to concrete medical cases. Students will understand Catholic directives on healthcare and Catholic ethical principles based on Church documents, tradition, scripture, and Catholic moral teaching. It will also explore issues involved in healthcare systems from a social justice perspective. Students will reflect on the meaning of suffering and death and discuss the ethical implications of new technologies in healthcare.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 299
Special Topics 1-3 HOURS ((1-3)-0-0); GAHR

During various semesters throughout the academic year, special topics in theology will be presented. Past topics include Scriptural Studies and Catholicism in the Movies.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

1-3
REL 311
World Religions 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course will introduce students to the reality of the 21st century global village through the perspectives of the major religions of the world, particularly Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will be challenged to examine the sacred traditions, sacred texts, prayer rituals, religious celebrations, art, music, and foods of these religious traditions. Students will explore, experience, and reflect upon the similarities and differences in each of the major world religions focusing upon creed, code, ceremony, worldview, and perceptions of the divine. Additionally, students will examine basic beliefs, practices, and historical developments, along with the relationship of each major world religion's view of suffering and death and the implications for healthcare.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 330
Spirituality and Theology in Christian Art 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course is an examination of the development of Christian theologies as expressed in Christian art from the 1st through 21st centuries. Topics will include a survey of the major periods of theological development and their expression in the visual arts of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other media. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural context and interpretation of image-texts and word-texts.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 335
Spirituality on the Page, Stage, and Screen 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course explores spiritual and religious themes in contemporary literature, theatre, and cinema. Students will analyze these themes through reading, video, discussion, and written projects.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 350
Religion and Science GAHR; 3 (3-0-0) Credit Hours

This course is a critical survey of the relationship between scientific and religious thought from the perspective of major developments in the history of Western science from antiquity to 20th/21st centuries. Special attention is paid to the interpenetration of the categories of science and religion, and the way this relationship transcends popular conflict narratives.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I Introduction to Theology

0
REL 360
Women and Religion 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course will examine the influence of women in Western religious traditions in a historical, cultural, and religious context (emphasizing Christianity). Particular focus will address women's historical and cultural participation in ministerial outreach in education and healthcare.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 380
Mission, Values, and Social Teaching 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the foundations of mission, an understanding of moral/ethical development as an approach to see, judge, act with regard to social issues, and practice in understanding, interpreting, and evaluating modern social teaching documents.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 382
Spirituality Care: Integration of Body, Mind, and Spirit Healing 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the biblical roots, pastoral images, and healing ministry of Jesus as they relate to the discipline of Spiritual Care. Through the identification of spiritual care approaches and the examination of ethical and developmental issues, students will gain insight into the complexity of the healthcare delivery system and the importance of interdisciplinary relationships among caregivers.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 385
Mission, Healthcare Ministry, and Enculturation 3 HOURS (3-0-0); Participation in the application process, including a letter of recommendation from a member of the faculty at Mercy College, is required prior to enrollment. GAHR

This course examines the role of mission, the Mercy College Values, and healthcare from their origins in Scripture and throughout history, specifically in the lives of Jesus Christ, Catherine McAuley, Florence Nightingale, Marguerite d'Youville, and Mother Teresa of Calcutta with special emphasis on the development of a personal and professional perspective of integrating these virtues into healthcare in the present. The course requires the student to participate in a week long (during Spring Break) mission experience in a developing country.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
REL 386
Native American Spirituality and Healthcare 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course examines spirituality, the Mercy College Values, and healthcare from their origins in Native American story and myth, the Bible, history, Native American culture, and Catholic Social Teaching. Special emphasis is given to the development of a personal and professional perspective of integrating these components into the student's knowledge and understanding of healthcare issues for Native American people in the United States.

3
REL 399
Special Topics 1-3 HOURS ((1-3)-0-0); GAHR

During various semesters throughout the academic year, special topics in theology will be presented. Past topics include Scriptural Studies and Catholicism in the Movies.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

1-3
REL 410
The Church in History 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHR

This course will provide, in a seminar style, a historical-critical examination of the development and influence of the Catholic Church in events of world history from the 1st Century CE to the present day. The Church's relationship with other faith traditions, as well as with secular movements, will be examined.

prerequisite(s): English Composition I

3
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

Sociology is the scientific study of society and social interaction. This course is designed to help students prepare for their medical profession in a cross-cultural setting by providing tools for more effective intercultural communications as well as giving us a mirror in which to see our own culture and society more clearly. Topics include socialization, culture, the social construction of knowledge, inequality, race and ethnic relations, social stratification, population, family, gender, religion, and political sociology.

3
SOC 150
Gerontology Overview 1 HOUR (1-0-0); GSBS

This course is designed as an exploratory overview of the field of aging (gerontology) for anyone in a healthcare field. Topics covered will include the biology, psychology, spirituality, and sociology of aging, human development in the late years, and leisure and retirement.

1
SOC 211
Cultural Diversity 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD or GSBS

This course provides an exploration of various cultures within modern American society. The definition of culture, cultural practices, prejudice and discrimination, and cultural sensitivity are covered. The exposure of students to new cultures is emphasized through presentations, hands-on learning, and experience. Topics include race and ethnicity, religion, gender, social class, family background, language, and age and generation.

3
SOC 280
Independent Study 1-5 HOURS ((1-5)-0-0); GSBS

Supervised independent work in sociology designed to meet approved objectives/learner outcomes. Student must meet specific criteria and present the instructor with a detailed written proposal. Written approval must be obtained from the instructor and dean. Up to three hours of credit will be awarded.

1-5
SOC 350
Global Issues 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

The main focus of this course will be to examine various definitions and concepts of globalization, current global issues focusing on poverty, crime, war, inequality, environment, global health policy, and diseases, and proposed solutions to these problems. In addition, students will locate evidence from a variety of sources, using the perspectives of different cultures.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
SOC 380
Understanding Consumer Behavior 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course is an exploration of buyer behavior of goods and services. Students will be encouraged to reflect upon their own consumption experiences amid a multicultural society. Topics covered will include globalization and consumer behavior, the consumer decision-making process, cross-cultural variations in consumer behavior, consumer healthcare behavior, and consumer movement and public policy.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
SOC 399
Special Topics 1-3 HOURS ((1-3)-0-0); GSBS

During various semesters throughout the academic year, special topics in sociology will be presented. Past topics include Global Issues and Korean Society.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

1-3
SOC 420
Sociology of Global Markets 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course is a sociological exploration of the global marketing process and practices. Case studies will include skin whitening and the cosmetics market, Whirlpool and the American appliance industry, the corporate sport media complex, global knowledge economy, global franchising, fashion, dietary supplements, organic vegetables supply chain, medical tourism, and the New Orleans' Mardi Gras celebration.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
SOC 450
Sociology of Health Care and Health Professions 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GSBS

This course introduces the sociological perspective on medicine, health, disease, health policy, and the health professions. The first part of the course focuses on many of the vital cultural, ethical, political, and economic issues affecting health and medical care today. The second part highlights professional socialization, patient-physician interactions, and the subjective experience of illness and disability. This course is particularly well-suited for health care students and professionals.

prerequisite(s): English Composition II

3
SPN 216
Spanish for Healthcare Professionals 3 HOURS (3-0-0); GAHD

The course is designed for students to gain beginning-level competence in Spanish for Healthcare Professionals that will enable them to communicate more effectively with Spanish-speaking patients and their families. Students will develop critical Spanish lexicon and language skills along with learning about relevant aspects of Hispanic cultures.

3
SUR 105
Intro to Surgical Technology 2 HOURS (2-0-0)
This introductory course provides the student with an overall understanding and orientation to the field of surgical technology as an integral health care professional in the delivery of perioperative patient care and surgical services. Included in this course are professional responsibilities and relations, interpersonal relationships and communication skills, understanding the needs of the surgical patient, special populations, death and dying, legal and ethical responsibilities, the operating room environment, and safety.
2
SUR 110
Principles and Practice of Surgical Technology 4 HOURS (2-2-0)
This course is designed to provide the student with an overall understanding and the hands-on skills involved in following medical and surgical aseptic techniques and in providing basic pre-operative care to the surgical patient including transporting, prepping, positioning, and draping. Incorporates safety, aseptic technique and duties of the scrubbed and the circulating surgical technologist during a surgical procedure, addresses surgical supplies, equipment, and instrumentation, introduces the theory of abdominal incisions, wound closures, and standard precaution skills, includes biomedical sciences of electricity, physics, and robotics as they pertain to surgical technology.

prerequisite(s): Intro to Surgical Technology

4
SUR 115
Surgical Procedures I 4 HOURS (3-1-0)
This course is designed to provide the student with an overall understanding of the theory and hands-on applications involved in surgical specialties of Diagnostic, General, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Genitourinary, Ophthalmic, Otorhinolaryngology, and Oral/Maxillofacial. Surgical anatomy for each specialty will be reviewed and pathophysiology as well as disease processes related to surgical procedures within these specialties.

prerequisite(s): Principles and Practice of Surgical Technology

4
SUR 120
Pharmacology for Surgical Technology 2 HOURS (2-0-0)
This course assesses the action, uses, and modes of administration of medication and anesthetic agents commonly used in the surgical setting. Students will understand the procedure for identifying medications/solutions on the sterile field, recognize the side effects and contraindications for various medications and anesthetic drugs, and compare the roles of the surgical technologist and circulator during administration of anesthesia. Emphasis is placed on safe practices in handling medications in the surgical setting.

prerequisite(s): Intro to Surgical Technology

2
SUR 135
Surgical Technology Directed Practice I 2 HOURS (1-0-1)
This course is an orientation to the clinical facility and surgical services department. Students will be assigned supervised, practical hands-on and observational experiences in the clinical area. As part of the experience, students may rotate throughout various departments within the clinical area. During this course, a strong emphasis is placed on the sterile processing department.

prerequisite(s): Principles and Practice of Surgical Technology

2
SUR 215
Surgical Procedures II 4 HOURS (3-1-0)
This course is designed to provide the student with an overall understanding of the theory and hands-on applications involved in surgical specialties of Plastic and Reconstructive, Orthopedic, Cardiothoracic, Peripheral Vascular, and Neurosurgery. Surgical anatomy for each specialty will be reviewed and pathophysiology as well as disease processes related to surgical procedures within these specialties.

prerequisite(s): Surgical Procedures I

4
SUR 235
Surgical Technology Directed Practice II 8 HOURS (1-0-7)
This course is a continuation of the student orientation to the clinical facility and surgical services department. Students will be assigned supervised, practical hands-on and observational experiences in the clinical area. As part of the experience, students may rotate throughout various departments within the clinical area. Upon course completion, students will meet or exceed the case requirements stated in the Association of Surgical Technologists Core Curriculum.

prerequisite(s): Surgical Technology Directed Practice I

8
SUR 245
Surgical Technology Directed Practice III 8 HOURS (1-0-7)
This course is a continuation of the student orientation to the clinical facility and surgical services department. Students will be assigned supervised, practical hands-on and observational experiences in the clinical area. As part of the experience, students may rotate throughout various departments within the clinical area. Upon course completion, students will meet or exceed the case requirements stated in the Association of Surgical Technologists Core Curriculum.

prerequisite(s): Surgical Technology Directed Practice II

8
SUR 250
Surgical Technology Capstone 1 HOURS (1-0-0)
This course is designed to investigate, discuss, and elaborate upon surgical technology principles and concepts. A review will be provided of the Surgical Technologist knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to provide quality surgical patient care and to prepare competent entry-level surgical technologists in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for the national certification exam in Surgical Technology. Test-taking strategies will be discussed and implemented with an in-depth review of application-level questions that require critical thinking skills. Professional development and career skills will also be discussed.

prerequisite(s): Surgical Technology Directed Practice II

1